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Germany pushes to delay agreed CO2 limit for cars by four years

The German government has proposed to postpone the implementation of the 95g CO2/km standard for new cars from 2020 to 2024, according to a proposal distributed to European ministers last Friday. This latest German attempt would effectively raise the 2020 target by nearly 10% to 104 g/km in 2020. It would also raise the average new car driver’ fuel bills by €138 a year as new vehicles will be less fuel efficient.

Effect of the German phase-in proposal to the 2020 target

Sketch of a book (default image for publications

Cars are responsible for an eighth of Europe’s carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions.  The amount of CO2 produced is directly related to the amount of fuel the vehicle consumes – lower carbon vehicles are therefore more fuel efficient and cheaper to run.

German proposal to weaken 95g cars CO2 law for 2020

Sketch of a book (default image for publications

The following leaked document is being circulated by Germany in order to try and persuade other EU countries to delay, by up to 4 years, the agreed car fuel efficiency standards of 95 g for 2020. This would result in a weakening of 9g and make any 2025 target impossible.

Merkel fights German carmakers’ battle

Germany’s luxury carmakers are raising the stakes in their battle to weaken EU legislation that will set fuel consumption limits for new cars made after 2020. The German chancellor Angela Merkel used a speech at this month’s Frankfurt motor show to say that strict limits would damage European carmakers’ competitiveness in global markets. Yet T&E’s eighth annual Cars & CO2 report shows that EU legislation is speeding up improvements to fuel efficiency, which in turn leads to drivers saving money at the fuel pump.

How clean are Europe's cars 2013

This report is the eighth T&E has published on the annual progress Europe’s major car manufacturers have made in reducing CO2 emissions and fuel consumption of new cars. As we did in previous reports, we also assess progress per EU Member State and review how official CO2 figures are translating into the ‘real world’.
 

Carmakers can free wheel to fuel efficiency targets, T&E report shows

Car manufacturers in Europe can free wheel their way to meeting targets to reduce CO2 emissions, Transport & Environment’s 2013 cars and CO2 report says. The report monitors the annual progress made by vehicle manufacturers to reduce fuel consumption and CO2 emissions of new cars. The data shows that both premium and mainstream carmakers are on track to hit their 2015 and 2020 targets. The report also finds carmakers do not need loopholes such as supercredits and manipulation of tests, which effectively weaken the targets, to meet their CO2 limits.

When is ein deal not a deal?

This Comment by Greg Archer was first published by European Voice.The discussion on how to lower the average new car emissions by 2020 has been acrimonious and protracted. Even though improving fuel efficiency is a no-regrets policy with multiple benefits: cheaper motoring costs; improved EU-energy security and the creation of hundreds of thousands of jobs.

‘Bad blood’ over cars & CO2

The battle to set emissions limits from new cars for 2020 is becoming increasingly bitter. Lobbying by Germany on behalf of its two leading luxury car makers led to the issue being removed from the agenda of a meeting expected to approve a negotiated settlement - an unprecedented move. Germany’s tactics have caused one senior Commission official to express concern about the integrity of the EU decision-making process, while diplomats have talked about ‘rogue behaviour’ by Berlin creating ‘bad blood’ among ministers.

Multiple benefits from investing in advanced clean vehicle technology

The potential for environmental technology in the automotive industry to create jobs, reduce vehicle running costs and harmful emissions, and lessen Europe’s dependence on imported oil has been highlighted in a new report published last month. Various scenarios suggest carbon dioxide could be cut by 64-97% by 2050, while 0.5-1.1 million additional jobs could be created by 2030.

German political muscle used to delay vote on 2020 car emissions limits

Representatives of EU Member States today delayed the vote on a deal that would have limited average car fleet emissions to 95g of CO2 per kilometre from 2020. Earlier this week, the European Parliament, the European Commission and the Irish Presidency of the European Council had reached an agreement, which was on the agenda of today’s meeting for endorsement by Member States.

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