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How clean are Europe's cars 2013

This report is the eighth T&E has published on the annual progress Europe’s major car manufacturers have made in reducing CO2 emissions and fuel consumption of new cars. As we did in previous reports, we also assess progress per EU Member State and review how official CO2 figures are translating into the ‘real world’.
 
Published on September 9, 2013 - 09:44

Methodology note on oil saving calculations for 'Stop the Oil Waste'

The following is the methodology note for the calculations used in T&E's original video 'Stop the Oil Waste', which details the waste from inefficient cars in Europe because of weakenings in proposed legislation. This waste is worth 35 billion EUR a year! The more fuel-efficient a car is, the cheaper it is to run. The European Parliament is currently deciding how fuel-efficient future cars in Europe should be. Weakening of the proposed car fuel-efficiency law (95 grams of CO2/km) will cause huge levels of oil waste and money. 

Published on June 13, 2013 - 16:10

Manipulation of fuel economy test results by carmakers: new evidence and solutions

A growing body of evidence shows the current test used to measure car fuel efficiency is outdated, unrepresentative of real-world driving and lax enough to allow carmakers to systematically manipulate official test results at the expense of consumers’ trust. European institutions are presently finalising a regulation to lower CO2 emissions from cars and vans in 2020. This has stimulated intense debate when and how a new official test should be introduced. This briefing informs this debate in the light of new evidence from the International Council on Clean Transportation (ICCT) that for the first time compares progress in official and real-world vehicle fuel efficiency on a brand-by-brand basis.

Published on May 28, 2013 - 09:34

Low emission car measures under the EU’s CO2 regulations for passenger cars

In 2009, the EU set legally binding targets for new cars to emit on average 130 grams of CO2 per kilometer (g/km) by 2015 and 95g/km in 2020. The way the 2020 target will be met is presently being considered by the European Parliament and Council following a Commission proposal in 2012. The Commission proposed to reintroduce a system of “supercredits". Supercredits, which proponents say will encourage supply of ultra-low carbon vehicles, also allow carmakers to supply less fuel-efficient conventional cars, weakening the emission target. This paper outlines the potential effects of different proposals for supercredits on the 95g target to help inform policymakers. It is based upon the results of an independent analysis of the options by Ricardo-AEA.

Published on April 22, 2013 - 11:54

Fact or Fiction? Car & CO2 Emissions Regulation

Proposals to lower CO2 emissions are currently being considered by the Environment Committee of the European Parlaiment. The amount of CO2 cars emit is directly related to the amount of fuel the vehicle consumes – lower carbon vehicles therefore use less fuel and are cheaper to run. This briefing outlines why 95g in the regulation should mean cars on average achieve 95g on the road and why flexibilities are unnecessary and counterproductive.

Published on April 15, 2013 - 14:11

The 95 grams fleet - TODAY

Cars are responsible for an eighth of Europe’s carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. The amount of CO2 produced is directly related to the amount of fuel the vehicle consumes – lower carbon vehicles are therefore more fuel efficient and cheaper to run. In 2009, the EU set legally-binding targets for new cars to emit 130 grams of CO2 per kilometre (g/km) by 2015 and 95g/km by 2020. Companies providing technology solutions to car-makers confirm 95g can be met through conventional technology without the need to shift to electric or hydrogen powered vehicles.

Published on March 27, 2013 - 10:36

Tired of Hot Air?

History has proved the car industry wrong – don’t let it happen again! This briefing document compares the car industry's claims with the realities of setting stricter CO2 emissions targets for cars.

Published on March 21, 2013 - 13:00

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