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Noise emission of Land Rover off-road vehicles

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Ahead of the noise vote on February 6, UK MEPs are being heavily lobbied to vote against noise standards by Land Rover, complaining that they can't comply with proposed limit values. Dutch consultancy TNO researched data in the official vehicle noise database and discovered that not only will Land Rover be able to comply, but most of their models already do!If Land Rover need some extra help achieving tighter noise standards, they could easily cut some dB by replacing their extremely noisy tyres (75dB) with equivalent quieter ones (72dB), which would also save fuel (see attached image - courtesy of http://www.kwik-fit.com/tyre-search.asp).

The case for 2025 targets for CO2 emissions from cars and vans - Report

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The EU has set a legally-binding target for new cars to emit no more than 95 grammes of CO2 per kilometre (g/km) by 2020. The target for vans is 147g/km. In July 2012, the European Commission announced its proposals on how these targets should be met. These proposals are currently being considered by the European Parliament and Council. The Commission did not propose further standards for 2025.This briefing outlines the arguments for setting strong 2025 targets and explains why industry arguments for delaying these targets are unfounded and would set back progress. It is based on new research by consultancy Ricardo-AEA (also downloadable in this page) as well as other evidence.

The right utility parameter – mass or footprint (or both)?

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In 2009, the EU set legally-binding targets for new cars to emit 130 grams of CO2 per kilometer (g/km) by 2015 and 95g/km in 2020.  In July, the Commission announced the outcome of its review of the modalities (ways) of achieving the 2020 target. The regulation takes account of the “utility” or purpose of the cars produced by different manufacturers whose targets therefore vary. In 2009, the EU agreed to account for the utility of the vehicles and set targets for individual manufacturers by comparing the average weight (mass) of the cars they produce. This was largely because data was not available on the average size (footprint) of registered cars until 2011. The Commission’s new proposal is to continue to use mass as a measure of utility until 2020 in order to minimize changes to the regulation. 

Road Vehicle Noise versus fuel consumption and pollutants emissions

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In the context of the European Parliament’s Environment, Public Health and Food Safety Committee (ENVI) vote on a Commission proposal [COM (2011) 856] for a Regulation on the sound levels of motor vehicles, this new study from TNO, independent experts that advise the Commission on both noise and CO2 regulations, shows that synergies between making cars mo

Véhicules à très faibles émissions de carbone et super crédits

En 2009, l'UE a instauré des normes contraignantes pour la performance des véhicules particuliers neufs: 130 grammes de dioxyde de carbone (CO2) par kilomètre (g/km) d'ici à 2015 et 95 g/km d'ici à 2020. La proposition récente de la Commission établit les modalités de la réalisation de l’objectif de 2020. Cette proposition de règlementation a confirmé l’objectif de 95 g/km mais a réintroduit les super crédits (récompenses pour les ventes de véhicules à très faibles émissions de carbone), qui affaiblissent l'objectif.

Ce document souligne pourquoi et comment le marché des voitures à très faibles émissions de carbone devrait être soutenu sans qu'il faille pour autant sacrifier la recherche sur l'amélioration des voitures conventionnelles.

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Les véhicules à faibles émissions de carbone : bons pour l'emploi en Europe

Le présent document et l’étude sur laquelle il se fonde apportent des éléments clés quant à l’impact sur l'emploi des véhicules à faibles émissions de carbone. Ils sont l'aboutissement d'une vaste revue de la littérature consacrée à la question réalisée par CE Delft.

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How clean are Europe's cars 2012

This report is the seventh T&E has published on the annual progress Europe’s major car manufacturers have made in reducing CO2 emissions and fuel consumption of new cars.

In previous years, we assessed how each carmaker was positioned to hit their mandatory CO2 standards that the European Union has set for 2015 (130 g/km on average).

Ultralow carbon vehicles and supercredits

In 2009, the EU set legally-binding targets for new cars to emit 130 grams of carbon dioxide (CO2) per kilometer (g/km) by 2015 and 95g/km in 2020.1 The Commission recently proposed a review of the way the 2020 target should be met.2 This confirmed the 95g/km value but reintroduced supercredits (additional rewards for sales of ultralow carbon vehicles) that weaken the target. This paper outlines why and how the market for ultralow carbon cars should be supported without reducing the wider benefits of improving the efficiency of conventional cars.

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