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Public consultations on the Effort Sharing Decision and Land use, Land Use Change and Forestry

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In these documents, T&E responds to the public consultations on the EU Effort Sharing Decision (ESD) and Land use, Land Use Change and Forestry (LULUCF). As transport is currently the largest sector within the ESD, it is vital to have a strong ESD with limited flexibilities to avoid watering down the EU climate targets and to achieve reductions in the transport sector. The way LULUCF is dealt with is also fundamental to avoiding a decrease in the level of ambition in sectors such as transport. For these reasons, T&E provided input to both consultations in close coordination with other environmental NGOs.

2025 CO2 Regulation: the next step to tackling transport emissions

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This briefing paper explains why setting 2025 CO2 standards for cars and vans offers benefits for drivers in lower fuel costs, job creation, energy security and tackling climate change. It is available in full and summarised versions. The paper highlights how the EU is falling behind in developing advanced efficient powertrains compared to competitors in Asia; and that due to testing flexibilities by 2021 the average vehicle is still likely to emit 150g CO2/km – meaning less than half of the anticipated savings through the regulation will be delivered.

Nissan accelerates Europe’s race for cleaner cars - report

Nissan has made the most rapid progress in cleaning up emissions from its fleet in Europe with a 12.1% reduction in official CO2 figures last year, T&E’s latest cars and CO2 report reveals. The report, in its 10th edition, tracks the annual progress made by vehicle manufacturers to reduce fuel consumption and CO2 emissions of new cars. It also found Nissan has been the best performer in driving fuel efficiency since EU CO2 limits were proposed in 2008, cutting CO2 by an average of 5.5% annually.

Peugeot Citroën lands top award for fuel-efficient cars

Have you ever wondered which car brand makes the most fuel-efficient cars? The award in 2014 goes to Peugeot Citroën with cars averaging 4.5 litres per 100km (110g CO2/km) – making it the lowest carbon carmaker. This is a key finding of the 10th edition, of ‘How clean are Europe’s cars?’ by sustainable transport group Transport & Environment (T&E), which annually tracks progress made by carmakers to reduce fuel consumption and CO2 emissions of new cars.

How clean are Europe’s cars 2015

The EU set legally-binding targets for new cars to emit on average 130 grams of CO₂ per kilometre (g/km) by 2015 and 95g/km by 2021. This report, the 10th annual edition in the series by T&E, analyses the official data from the European Environment Agency on progress towards these targets made by carmakers in 2014. Click below to download the report and infographic.

Road to 2030: how EU vehicle efficiency standards help member states meet climate targets

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This paper attempts to quantify the challenge for EU member states in reducing transport emissions under the expected 2030 ‘effort sharing decision’ and the extent to which CO2 standards for cars, vans and trucks can help achieve those targets.

Vehicle fuel efficiency standards can help EU countries halve their climate obligations from transport – study

Europe can only meet the climate targets Heads of State agreed on for sectors outside the Emissions Trading System (ETS) if it sets fuel efficiency standards for new cars, vans and lorries by 2025 or earlier, a new study by Transport & Environment (T&E) reveals [1]. In a middle-of-the-road scenario where transport would cut CO2 emissions by 30% by 2030 [2], the study found that CO2 standards for all vehicles (cars, vans and lorries) in 2025 and 2030 would deliver a whopping 42% of the emissions reduction required from transport. 

Can Google, Uber, BlaBlaCar and Zipcar make mobility cleaner?

Transport is not the most innovative of sectors so when the top people of Uber, Google, Nokia, Zipcar and BlaBlaCar got together at the International Transport Forum in Leipzig last week, there was an air of excitement. The picture they painted was of a radically different transport system, revolutionized by the internet, mobile phones and autonomous, electric driving. What this could mean for people was captured well by Philippe Crist from the OECD. He estimates the advent of the digital age could reduce the number of cars by an eye-popping 90% in urban areas.

EU adopts world’s first test for diesel car emissions ‘on the road’

EU regulators have today agreed new test procedures that will, for the first time, measure the ‘real world’ emissions of diesel cars under the Euro 6 air quality standard. It will require vehicles to be tested on roads rather than in laboratories, overcoming obsolete tests and ‘cycle beating’ techniques used by carmakers to achieve results in tests many times lower than actual air pollution emissions on the road.

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