What IATA said about emissions trading: then and now

This briefing highlights quotes from two IATA reports, from 2001 and 2007, that show the aviation industry initially supported the concept of emissions trading for aviation, going as far as calling it a "no brainer" that would "maximise gain".  However, more recent quotes from the organisation's CEO show that now the EU has led efforts to actually introduce such a scheme, IATA has changed its mind and launched an all-out attack against it.

Erodes profit, or makes profit?

Now

The EU-ETS could erode more than 30 percent from the struggling industry’s profits
Tony Tyler, CEO of The International Air Transport Association (IATA), 14 February 2012

Then

“The net financial impact on extra-EU flights may be slightly positive. “
IATA study, 2007 (removed from IATA website)

Emissions trading system is a "no brainer" because it "enables emissions reductions to be made at the lowest cost", allowing the industry to "maximise gain, and minimise pain".
IATA study, 2001 (removed from IATA website)

Distorting or not distorting?

Now

“Airlines, of course, also see (the EU-ETS) as a problem because it is introducing distortions into the market.”
Tony Tyler, CEO of IATA, 17 February 2012

Then

Emissions trading would have to apply to all airlines operating on a route or risk "potentially serious competitive distortions". 
IATA study, 2001 (removed from IATA website)

International solution vs EU action

Now

The EU’s “unilateral approach must change,"
Tony Tyler, CEO of IATA, 13 February 2012

Then

"it is politically unrealistic to expect developing countries to accept an international aviation emissions commitment in the short term".
IATA study, 2001 (removed from IATA website)

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