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New Polar Code ‘too weak’ to protect polar environments

The world’s first code of conduct for ships using the newly accessible Arctic shipping routes has been agreed, but environmental groups say it does not go far enough and, without further strengthening, it is just a question of when a serious incident occurs in the Arctic and Antarctic environments.

Brussels and Gothenburg highlight difficulties of tackling congestion

The unofficial capital of Europe is the most congested city in Europe, according to the latest ranking of congested cities, but opinion sampling and a vote in Gothenburg suggest public willingness for tackling congestion is not great.

High diesel NOx emissions ‘likely for decades’ due to failing tests

High levels of nitrogen oxides (NOx) in cities, caused by diesel cars, are likely to persist for decades, the UK Government was recently forced to admit. In evidence to the European Court of Justice, in a case brought by Client Earth, the government admitted it would be at least 2030 before London, Leeds and Birmingham meet nitrogen dioxide standards that should have been achieved in 2010.

Cargo bike revolution helps business and environment

The vehicle pictured may look like something from a James Bond film, but it is one of a range of ‘cargo bikes’ that have been heavily promoted over the last couple of months, following the conclusion of a survey showing the potential benefits of deliveries by bicycle.

Car CO2 emissions drop 4%, but test manipulation at play

Carbon dioxide missions from new cars sold in the EU decreased almost 4% in 2013 compared to the previous year, according to provisional data from the European Environment Agency (EEA). But T&E has warned that the official figures do not match up on the road. While progress has been made by carmakers, flaws in the emissions test exaggerate the improvements, it is claimed.

How to make transport policies healthier, wealthier and wiser

One of the frustrations of EU transport policy is the relentless focus on the internal market as the one-and-only justification for setting standards, introducing rules or spending money. It leaves us all short-changed. On the rare occasion that ‘Brussels’ tries to make suggestions for cities’ or regions’ transport policies to improve air quality, safety or health, the spectre of ‘subsidiarity’ spooks everyone and the idea vanishes.

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