Browse by topic: Publication, Air Pollution, Briefing

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Does sharing cars really reduce car use?

The average car sits unused for more than 90% of the time, carries on average just one and a half people and costs, on average, €6,500 a year to own and run. Each car occupies 150m2 of urban land and still this is not the full bill  – congestion costs the EU economy €100 billion annually. The convenience that made the car a 20th century icon has been eroded by its popularity.

Published on June 27, 2017 - 15:34

Stalemate fixing dirty diesels: Countries putting carmakers’ needs before those of citizens

This briefing outlines how, more than a year since the VW scandal broke and almost a year since the new reform of EU testing system was proposed, there is minimal progress to tackle the legacy of dirty diesel cars on the road. No action whatsoever has been taken to reduce the emissions of 80% of the most grossly emitting diesel cars. Out of the 20% of cars subject to some recalls. The briefing also outlines how the latest leaked documents reveal that the majority of member states are also trying to block and weaken any future reform on the newly proposed Type Approval Framework Regulation, stripping the Commission of any powers to do independent checks on in-use vehicles.

Published on November 29, 2016 - 10:05

How the EU can better align spending with its climate and energy targets

The EU’s Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF) determines how EU money is spent. The current €1 trillion budget runs from 2014 to 2020 with almost €100 billion earmarked for investment in the transport sector. The current MFF Regulation states that “the Commission should present a proposal for a new multiannual financial framework before 1 January 2018”. This budget would most likely start from 2021.

Transport is the largest source of EU emissions and accounts for around a quarter of EU GHG emissions. Meanwhile air pollution from road transport contributes to over 400.000 premature deaths per year, 26.000 people die in traffic annually and the EU economy loses €100 billion every year in congestion. A large portion of the EU’s budget is currently spent on expanding road infrastructure and building up fossil fuel infrastructure (e.g. LNG terminals). A future EU budget should invest tax payers money more carefully, and prioritize investment in infrastructure that reduces the environmental impact of transport and assists member states in reaching their climate goals. In this paper T&E outlines how part of the post-2020 budget should be allocated.

Published on September 19, 2017 - 14:48

The role of road charging in improving transport

On 31 May 2017, the European Commission published its proposal to review the ‘Eurovignette’ Directive. The Directive defines how Member States of the European Union can charge vehicles for their use of road infrastructure and was conceived to ensure the proper functioning of the EU transport market. Transport accounts for around a quarter of EU GHG emissions. Meanwhile air pollution from road transport contributes to over 400,000 premature deaths per year, 26,000 people die in traffic annually, and the EU economy loses €100 bn every year in congestion. This briefing outlines why road charging is a key instrument to tackle this.

Published on September 12, 2017 - 14:49

Introduction of WLTP and RDE tests

The introduction of the new car tests, the WLTP and RDE tests, marks an important milestone in the battle to ensure cars comply with environmental limits on the road and to end the cheating that has become endemic in emissions testing. But, as this briefing outlines, new tests are not a panacea and will need to be further refined to ensure they are really representative of how cars are driven. The forthcoming decisions on how and who approves cars for sale will be key to ensuring the system of approvals is independent and rigorously enforced.

Published on September 1, 2017 - 10:46

Fixing Dieselgate in Europe

One and a half years since the VW and ensuing Dieselgate scandal erupted, continuing inaction by Europe’s 28 car regulators have resulted in almost 35 million dirty diesels on Europe’s roads. These will continue to pollute the air for decades to come and already result in nearly 7,000 premature deaths annually which could have been avoided if the EU air pollution limits were met. This briefing explain's T&E's analysis of the data, how the car approval system has been discredited, and how member states are falling short in their ambition for reform. It also outlines the position of Germany; the champion for dirty diesel.

Published on May 29, 2017 - 14:40

For member states, Dieselgate never happened

It has been more than a year since the European Commission presented its type approval proposals (or TAFR) to reform the current system of vehicles testing following the Dieselgate scandal. Following extensive consideration by the European Parliament and Council of Ministers, the final negotiations to agree the changes are imminent. The Parliament voted its position on 4 April; the Council is expected to agree most technical details at a working group meeting on the 26 and 27 April and reach a final agreement at the Competitiveness Council on 29 May.

Published on April 25, 2017 - 14:00

Why MEPs should support an EU Vehicle Surveillance Agency

Following the Dieselgate emissions scandal, European policy-makers are currently discussing the reform of the EU vehicle testing system (or the Type Approval Framework Regulation - TAFR). This briefing outlines why the legislative proposal is a once-in-a-decade opportunity to fix today’s obsolete and ineffective way of checking that cars, vans, trucks and their parts and components meet EU safety and environmental standards.

Published on March 31, 2017 - 16:54

VECTO: Comparison of the conformity of aerodynamic resistance in Europe and the US

In the light of discussion on a new test procedure for truck CO2 emissions (VECTO), this study commissioned by T&E compares the test procedures in the US and EU to measure the aerodynamic resistance of trucks and what tolerances can be used. The research concludes that the 10% tolerance currently discussed for VECTO should clearly be adjusted downwards and therefore suggests a maximum tolerance of 5%.

Published on March 22, 2017 - 15:51

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