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Europe caves in to foreign pressure, guts aviation emissions-reduction law

Members of the European Parliament today capitulated to pressure, bullying and threats from third countries, the aviation industry and EU leaders lacking vision and courage by voting to shrink the aviation emissions trading system (ETS). The weakened ETS will only cover flights between EU airports until 2017, which leaves long-haul flights totally unregulated and thus reduces the amount of CO2 emissions covered by three quarters, compared with the original full aviation ETS agreed in 2008.

MEPs to vote on EU’s right to regulate aviation emissions

MEPs will vote this week on whether Europe should exercise its sovereign right to regulate aviation emissions in the EU’s own airspace. In a full plenary vote on 3 April, parliamentarians will consider the leading environment committee’s decision to support ‘airspace’ scope for the aviation emissions trading system (ETS), which overturned the recommendation from the trilogue to restrict coverage to intra-EU flights only.

MEPs fly in the face of bullying on EU aviation emissions trading

Members of the European Parliament’s environment committee today courageously voted against a bad deal on aviation emissions trading foisted on them by political leaders in the UK, France and Germany. The bad deal, reached during trilogue negotiations, would have scaled back the Commission’s proposal to regulate all aviation emissions in EU airspace, in favour of only covering flights between EU airports until 2016. This would have exempted long-haul flights from all regulation, even though they account for the bulk of EU emissions. CO2 emissions coverage would have been reduced by three quarters compared to the original scheme.

Social democrats could overturn vote to dismantle aviation emissions trading

MEPs from the socialist S&D group are still deciding on next week’s vote to only regulate CO2 emissions of intra-European flights which, T&E argues, effectively dismantles the aviation emissions trading system (ETS). The Parliament’s environment committee will consider the trilogue deal, which reflects EU governments’ giving in to pressure from third countries, the aviation industry and Airbus.

Vote NO to the dismantling of the Aviation ETS

The European Parliament's Environment Committee votes on 19 March 2014 on the flawed agreement on aviation in the Emissions Trading System. Transport & Environment believes this deal should be REJECTED and urges all Members of the European Parliament to vote NO to it in order to secure a better deal.

EU governments dismantle emissions trading for international aviation

EU member states yesterday succumbed to pressure from third countries and the aviation industry and decided to shrink the aviation emissions trading system (ETS) to only cover flights between EU airports until 2016. This decision leaves long-haul flights totally unregulated and sends the signal internationally that EU sovereignty can be curtailed through outside pressure.

People flying Ryanair should pay for their own tickets

Last week saw Europe extend its dirtiest subsidy, the one that makes ultra-cheap air tickets possible, by at least another decade. That’s the simplest way to sum up new rules for state aid to regional airports and airlines. The text itself is, as usual, almost impossible to read for lay people, so in this piece I will try to paint the rules and their consequences as simply as possible.

Environmentalists urge governments to make foreign airlines pay for pollution in Europe

Green NGOs [1] have made formal requests to the Emissions Trading System (ETS) enforcement authorities in Germany, the Netherlands and the UK to take all necessary enforcement actions against airlines that failed to comply with the ETS in 2012.  

State subsidies for airports set to soar

State subsidies for regional airports and airlines serving them – mainly the low-cost airlines – will be allowed to continue for at least another 10 years, according to the Commission’s finalised guidelines on state aid for airports. The revised guidelines, which cannot now be challenged by MEPs, are ostensibly aimed at streamlining and tightening state aid for airports.

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