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Breakthrough on efforts to reduce emissions from aircraft

Icao proposes ‘metric’ but NGOs still worried whether work will have a real impactEfforts to tackle emissions from aviation have taken a hesitant step forward, with the news that the International Civil Aviation Organisation (Icao) has endorsed an expert group’s recommendation on the way to measure fuel burn in flight. The recommendation is for a ‘metric’ system and test cycle to be the basis for setting fuel efficiency standards for new aircraft, but many concerns remain.

Q: When is a rail project not a rail project? A: When it's meant to get people into planes.

The EU should not be funding airport projects, or dressing up airport express train links as green "intermodal hubs" says T&E's deputy director Nina Renshaw.

End of legal challenge to aviation in ETS, but will opposition now move elsewhere?

Sky with contrails

The coalition of American aviation interests that challenged the EU’s right to introduce emissions trading to air transport has abandoned its legal action. A group of six NGOs welcomed the decision, but said the airline coalition’s failure to accept December’s ruling by the European Court of Justice suggests the Americans may be moving the battlefield elsewhere.

What IATA said about emissions trading: then and now

This briefing highlights quotes from two IATA reports, from 2001 and 2007, that show the aviation industry initially supported the concept of emissions trading for aviation, going as far as calling it a "no brainer" that would "maximise gain".  However, more recent quotes from the organisation's CEO show that now the EU has led efforts to actually introduce such a scheme, IATA has changed its mind and launched an all-out attack against it.

This is the moment of truth for Icao

Editorial by Jos Dings, T&E Director
If you listen carefully through the cacophony surrounding the inclusion of aviation in Europe’s Emissions Trading System, there is progress. Important progress.The verdict of the European Court of Justice cleared the legal hurdle, which even more clearly exposes this fight for what it really is: a political power struggle between the most important economic blocs on the planet.

A brave new but uncertain era for aviation and environment

The world’s first transnational scheme that forces airlines to pay for the costs of their carbon emissions came into effect on 1 January. Following a historic ruling by the European Court of Justice on 21 December that declared emissions trading for airlines using EU airspace legal, airlines can now only use EU airports if they have the necessary emissions permits to do so. Yet the battle continues, with various non-EU countries threatening other forms of retaliation, and the EU standing firm, saying it will only make concessions if there is a global measure.

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