ZEV better

Low-emission cars are good for our drivers, for our economy, for our citizens and for our independence. But zero-emission cars are BETTER!

There are four powerful reasons why MEPs should vote for more ambition on the cars CO2 law and promote the shift to zero-emission vehicles (ZEV)

ZEVs are BETTER for our CITIZENS:

Almost ¾ of the EU 28 population leave in urban area where fossil cars are the main culprit of the air pollution issue. Road traffic is also the biggest source of noise pollution in Europe. Noise from road traffic alone is the second most harmful environmental stressor in Europe, behind air pollution, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). Fossil cars emit CO2, which is a massive issue for the planet. Climate change is now undeniable and this very hot summer proved it once again.

ZEVs are BETTER for our JOBS:

The car industry is expected to change more in the next five years than it has in the last 100. It is a moment at which it must adapt and change to survive. Famously, other great European companies, like Nokia, failed because they were too slow to change. Europe needs to help its leading carmakers in the global race to electrify mobility and avoid being overtaken by US, Korean and Chinese competitors.

The shift to electric vehicles will help European carmakers remain competitive and contribute to job creation across the continent. An economic analysis, which gathered input from carmakers, auto suppliers, energy companies, NGOs and consumer groups, shows that more than 200,000 jobs can be created with a shift from fossil fuel powered cars to electric vehicles. By 2030 the shift in spending away from diesel and gasoline use in road transport would reduce Europeans’ spending on imported oil by €49 billion.

There is a serious threat to auto jobs due to automation and outsourcing to regions with lower labour costs and modern factories. European carmakers are already investing seven times more in electric vehicle production in China than at home. EU lawmakers have a choice: either set an EV sales target to keep auto jobs at home, or allow European carmakers to go on selling dirty diesels here while investing the earnings in EV production abroad and importing back made-in-China electric cars. With a small market for EVs in Europe it will be easier for carmakers to meet demand through imports. This is why Europe needs to compete with China and start exporting European-made EVs around the world.

Leading the electromobility race is one way to keep jobs in Europe.

Europe can work for its citizens! #ZeroEmissionCarsBETTER

ZEVs are BETTER for DRIVERS:

A reduction in CO2 emissions from new cars measured on the road directly translates into less fuel burned, lowering fuel bills for drivers. Zero-emission cars running on clean electricity are even cheaper, as their running costs are ultra low.

With existing tax breaks and purchase subsidies, electric cars are already cheaper over four years to own and run than petrol or diesel cars in many countries.

European drivers would save over €700 every year in lower fuel bills with a 25% reduction target in 2025 compared to the average new car today.

Calculation:

Fuel savings compared to a new car with emissions of 118g/km in 2017. It assumes 20,000 km per year – typical of a new car. A share of new car sales of 40% diesel and 60% gasoline. Fuel cost of petrol €1.31 per litre and diesel €1.11. A 42% gap between test and real-world emissions remains unchanged. This results in an average fuel saving of €707 per year per car.

More than half of new cars sold are bought by businesses and for second and third hand owners electric cars are much cheaper to run within minimal running and maintenance costs.

This is the 1st of the #4WinsForEurope, which we will be releasing every week leading to the European Parliament plenary vote on the CO2 reduction targets for cars and vans for 2025 and 2030.

Europe can work for its citizens! #ZeroEmissionCarsBETTER

Want to TAKE ACTION? Please tell your local MEPs to support zero-emission cars when they vote in the first week of October here.

 

ZEVs are BETTER for our INDEPENDENCE:

Electric and hydrogen cars rely on renewable electricity that the EU can produce locally. But, instead, fossil-fuelled cars are driving Europe's addiction to foreign oil.

Five facts about the EU’s oil use:

1. Oil (crude oil plus petroleum products) represents around a third of the EU’s total energy consumption;
2. The EU imports around 90% of the oil it needs and this share is expected to rise in the future.
3. Two-thirds of the EU’s oil is used in transport.
4. Around a third of the oil used in Europe is bought from Russia and this is forecast to rise in the next decade
5. Around 70% of Russia’s oil production is sold in Europe.

The EU is sending money to Russia
Russian military expenditure is bank-rolled by the EU’s oil addiction. Each time we fill our tanks, we are sending about €7 to Russia – based on an analysis of where EU countries obtain their oil supplies. (Based on Cambridge Econometrics’ Fuelling Europe’s Future report (2018), 32% of money paid at the pump leaves the EU economy. The average tank of fuel costs €70 and one-third of our crude oil and refined petroleum products comes from Russia.)

The EU currently buys around $125 billion of Russian oil per annum in the form of both crude oil ($87 billion) and refined products ($37 billion). These revenues are used to fund Russia’s annual military expenditure, that some estimates put as high as $66 billion. Over a third of Russia’s federal budget revenues are derived from oil and natural gas activities, and military spending is closely related to the income earned. As the price of oil and gas rises and the rouble strengthens, Russia is able to increase its military expenditure.

Rising oil demand in Europe has funded increases in Russian military expenditure over the last decade. This military spending only fell back in 2017 as a result of the collapse in the value of the rouble and low oil prices. The figure illustrates the clear link.

Who buys the most?
The Netherlands is the biggest importer of Russian crude and refined products through its Rotterdam port, buying $25.5 billion of Russian oil products annually. That is enough revenue to buy 511 of the new Russian fighter jet, the Sukhoi Su-57, which is priced at $50 million per jet. Alternatively the revenues enable Russia to buy 6,907 of the new Russian battle tank, the T-14 Armata, which is priced at $3.7 million per tank. The biggest expenditures are tabled below:

Country

$ million

Jets at $50m each

Tanks at $3.7m each

Netherlands

25,557

511

6,907

Germany

24,429

489

6,603

Poland

12,095

242

3,269

France

7,970

159

2,154

Belgium

7,601

152

2,054

Finland

6,133

123

1,658

Sweden

5,207

104

1,407

Lithuania

4,437

89

1,199

United Kingdom

4,244

85

1,147

Italy

3,404

68

920

Spain

3,072

61

830

Rest

20,447

409

5,526

EU28

124,595

2,492

33,674

Bulgaria, Poland, Lithuania and Slovakia buy more than 80% of their crude oil and refined products from Russia. This online tool shows historical and projected imports.

Only two of the top 10 oil suppliers to the EU are European (Shell and Statoil); two are Russian; three are based in the Middle East; and two are American. After Russia, a group of Arab OPEC states including Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Libya, Kuwait and Algeria supply roughly a quarter of the EU’s oil – providing the revenues for military expenditure which has contributed to regional instability.

Towards energy sovereignty
But there is the prospect of the EU ending its bank-rolling of military superpowers hostile to its democracy. Electric and hydrogen cars rely on renewable electricity that the EU can produce locally. By buying locally produced electricity for our cars we create growth and 200,000 jobs in Europe.

A shift to electric cars is good for jobs, good for drivers, good for our planet and cuts off the funds to regimes that threaten and try to destabilise our democracy. It is a win-win solution.

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