• How to decarbonise European transport by 2050

    Transport is Europe's biggest climate problem accounting for 27% of its GHG emissions in 2017. This report summarises a series of studies by Transport & Environment. (T&E analysed pathways for decarbonisation in the road freight, aviation, shipping and car sectors.) It demonstrates that transport can and must be decarbonised by 2050 at the very latest, not only to limit global warming but also to ensure Europe's competitiveness, its energy sovereignty and the health and well-being of its 500 million citizens.

    Published on November 27, 2018 - 08:45
  • Natural gas-powered vehicles and ships – the facts

    The EU has agreed to cut its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by at least 80-95% by 2050. Climate policy will require a shift away from petroleum which currently provides nearly all of transport’s energy needs. Apart from a transition towards zero-emission technologies such as battery electric or hydrogen, regulators and governments across Europe are considering what role gas could play in decarbonising transport. This report compiles the latest evidence on the environmental impacts of using gas as a transport fuel.

    Published on October 24, 2018 - 06:00
  • Cost analysis of Arctic HFO ban for cruise shipping

    The main purpose of the analysis is to better understand the nature of the likely cost impact of Arctic HFO ban on Cruise industry and passenger ticket prices and in doing so, contribute to informed decision-making at the International Maritime Organisation (IMO). This study has analysed these costs for cruise industry using three summer 2018 trips of MS Rotterdam to the Arctic as case studies.

    Published on October 10, 2018 - 05:00
  • EU-listed yards can handle the recycling demand of EU-flagged ships

    The NGO Shipbreaking Platform and T&E have taken a closer look at the capacity available for ship recycling under the EU Ship Recycling Regulation. The shipping industry claims that there is not enough capacity for the safe and environmentally sound recycling for the EU-flagged fleet under this legislation, and state that it will be forced to leave EU ship registries so that it can find other breaking options outside the scope of the Regulation.

    Published on September 24, 2018 - 05:00
  • LNG as a marine fuel in the EU

    In light of the recently adopted initial IMO strategy on reduction of GHG emissions and the Paris agreement, there is a need to better understand the potential market for LNG as a marine fuel, bunkering infrastructure investments required and associated risks in the context of shipping GHG reduction. This report attempts to assess the prospective future public and private financial investments by EU member states into LNG port/bunkering infrastructure consistent with EU plans to foster the widespread uptake of LNG as a means of decarbonising the shipping sector up to 2050. EU member states are mandated to set up LNG port infrastructure under the 2014 Alternative Fuels Infrastructure Directive.

    Published on June 26, 2018 - 09:58
  • Aviation and shipping emissions and national climate pledges

    As the rule book for the Paris Agreement is finalised, T&E produces a paper which proposes the full inclusion of emissions from international shipping and aviation in national climate targets, known under the Paris Agreement as nationally determined contributions (NDCs). States should pursue decarbonisation of these sectors through a combination of measures adopted at international and national level.

    Published on May 4, 2018 - 12:26
  • Initial IMO greenhouse gas strategy

    After several attempts to act on ship greenhouse gas emissions, the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) finally agreed in 2016 on a seven-year GHG Roadmap (work programme) to discuss and agree on measures to address shipping’s climate impact. The organisation is meeting in London this April 3-13 to agree an initial GHG strategy as part of its GHG Roadmap. This paper outlines what T&E believes that stratedgy should contain.

    Published on March 26, 2018 - 15:28
  • Statistical analysis of the energy efficiency performance (EEDI) of new ships

    Almost three-quarters (71%) of all new containerships, which emit around a quarter of global ship CO2 emissions, already comply with the post-2025 requirements of the IMO’s Energy Efficiency Design Index (EEDI), a new study reveals. Additionally, the best 10% of new containerships are already almost twice as efficient as the requirement for 10 years time. These findings are part of a study based on analysis of the International Maritime Organisation’s (IMO) own data and conducted by Transport & Environment (T&E), a founding member of the Clean Shipping Coalition (CSC).

    Published on October 2, 2017 - 14:48

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