One of the most important steps Europe can take to save drivers money, combat climate change, and create high-tech jobs is to require carmakers to produce more efficient vehicles. In 2008, the EU introduced legally-binding CO2 standards, for the first time setting a goal that, on average, new cars sold in Europe in 2015 should emit 130 grammes of CO2 per kilometre. This weak target has been met early, and most carmakers are on track to meet the 2021 goal of 95g. Half the improvement results from carmakers manipulating the obsolete test that must be replaced in 2017. The Commission also needs to make a new proposal for 2025 standards for cars and vans in 2017.

  • How EU Member States roll-out electric-mobility: electric charging infrastructure in 2020 and beyond

    Sufficient accessible charging infrastructure is a key enabler for the accelerated uptake of electric cars. This briefing analyses the current and planned future roll-out of EV charging infrastructure in European Member States, based governments’ plans (National Policy Frameworks) submitted to the Commission as part of the implementation of the Alternative Fuels Infrastructure Directive.

    Published on February 27, 2018 - 09:55
  • A green tax shift to transport can help fix the EU budget

    Transport is Europe’s biggest climate problem, representing 27% of the bloc’s greenhouse gas emissions. If Europe is to meet its climate targets and avoid the severe impacts of climate change, additional action is needed to tackle emissions from the transport sector. Meanwhile, the EU is drafting the post-2020 budget with a proposal expected in May 2018. The annual €10-14 billion gap that will be left as a result of the UK’s departure from the EU has triggered debate on alternative sources of revenue for the EU budget. This position paper outlines how a green tax shift has a key role to play in tackling transport emissions and addressing a gap in the EU's budget post-2020.

    Published on February 22, 2018 - 11:28
  • CO2 emissions from vans: time to put them back on track

    Light commercial vehicles, or vans, are a neglected area of EU road transport policy as they are often exempt from safety and environmental policy such as driving regulations or tolls, compared to their direct competitors, trucks. This enhances their attractiveness and in part explains why their use and emissions are growing. CO2 standards for van makers are much weaker than for cars, as a result van makers do not deploy the same efficient and innovative technologies to vans to lower their emissions.

    Published on February 15, 2018 - 07:06
  • The role of electrofuel technologies in Europe's low-carbon transport future

    Electro or e-fuels (or power to liquid/gas) are electricity-based gaseous or liquid fuels which can be used in internal combustion engines. According to a new report by Cerulogy for T&E, e-fuels only have meaningful climate benefits if strict sustainability criteria are observed throughout the production process. The key factors determining the sustainability of e-fuels are the source of electricity (it must be renewable), the source of CO2 (ideally air capture) as well as impacts on land and water. Download the study below plus T&E's briefing.

    Published on November 21, 2017 - 16:14
  • Clean (2nd) Mobility Package

    This briefing for MEPs, ahead of a plenary debate on the European Commission’s '2nd Mobility Package', provides details on the proposed car and van CO2 target for 2025 and 2030 and why these lack the necessary ambition to meet the EU’s climate goals, specifically:• There will be a slow down in emissions cuts after 2021;• There is no ZEV mandate or penalty for failing to hit the goal;• There is no effective means to prevent test manipulation such as a real-world test.The briefing also provides information on the strengths and weaknesses of other elements of the package – the Clean Vehicles Directive and Alternative Fuels Infrastructure Action Plan – and suggests areas of questioning for the Commission.

    Published on November 14, 2017 - 14:40
  • Car CO2 regulation: The case and content of an effective proposal

    Following the unhelpful intervention of the Juncker Cabinet it would be preferable to delay the proposal and negotiate on key points to produce a stronger outcome. The alternative is to issue a weak proposal that does not put the EU on a track to meet its climate goals and the EU industry on a path to becoming globally competitive and manufacturing new technology vehicles in the EU. 

    Published on October 31, 2017 - 14:47
  • Designing representative vehicle tests

    This briefing summarises the important lessons for design of future EU vehicle regulations that have been concluded from an extensive programme of more than 400 real world car tests. The tests have been performed on Peugeot Citroën Group (PSA) cars as part of programme conducted by PSA in collaboration with Transport & Environment, France Nature Environnement and Bureau Veritas. The purpose was to provide PSA customers with reliable real world information on fuel economy and emissions. The views expressed in this briefing are solely those of T&E, but a technical report agreed by PSA and T&E has already been published presenting the comprehensive data.

    Published on October 27, 2017 - 11:13
  • Why the EU needs a zero emission vehicle sales target and what it should look like

    The forthcoming Commission proposal on CO2 standards for light duty vehicles needs to create a single European market for electro-mobility by setting a sales target for zero emission vehicles. With a Chinese EV quota coming in 2019, and the Californian scheme accelerating ZEV sales until 2025, policy makers now need to ensure Europe accelerates its transition to this key new technology to ensure its industry remains globally competitive and ZEVs are manufactured in the EU and not imported from China. Key elements of the ZEV Mandate should be:An ambition level for 2025 of 15-20% to ensure that the transport sectors’ climate targets are met. This is meeting car makers’ own announced average EV share for Europe in 2025 (20%).

    Published on October 26, 2017 - 15:28
  • Cars and vans: how to stop CO2 emissions growing?

    Road transport is one of the few EU sectors where CO2 emissions continue to grow. To address the problem, the Commission plans to publish its proposals on car and van CO2 standards in November, followed by fuel efficiency standards for trucks in early 2018. Using its new EUTRM model, Transport & Environment has analysed the emission reductions of different ambition levels and their contribution to help achieve the 2030 non-ETS targets required from road transport. The key results are:

    Published on October 11, 2017 - 12:02