Browse by topic

Filters:

Electric cars slow to catch on

An analysis of market forecasts for low-carbon cars suggests the take-up of electric vehicles will have a very slow take-up over the next decade. The analysis, Powering Ahead by the Ricardo-AEA consultancy, says the total number of plug-in hybrid and pure battery-powered cars being sold each year in the UK by 2020 will not exceed 200 000 and may even be as low as 40 000.

Published on April 18, 2013 - 12:07

Fact or Fiction? Car & CO2 Emissions Regulation

Proposals to lower CO2 emissions are currently being considered by the Environment Committee of the European Parlaiment. The amount of CO2 cars emit is directly related to the amount of fuel the vehicle consumes – lower carbon vehicles therefore use less fuel and are cheaper to run. This briefing outlines why 95g in the regulation should mean cars on average achieve 95g on the road and why flexibilities are unnecessary and counterproductive.

Published on April 15, 2013 - 14:11

Stop the Oil Waste - 95 MEANS 95

When? 
Monday, April 22, 2013 - 18:30 to 20:00
Where? 
European Parliament, Altiero Spinelli Building
ASP 5th floor balcony
1047 Brussels
Belgium

 

What?

During the last week of April, the ENVI Committee will vote on regulation that will determine how efficient European cars will be from 2020.

Published on April 2, 2013 - 13:50

The 95 grams fleet - TODAY

Cars are responsible for an eighth of Europe’s carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. The amount of CO2 produced is directly related to the amount of fuel the vehicle consumes – lower carbon vehicles are therefore more fuel efficient and cheaper to run. In 2009, the EU set legally-binding targets for new cars to emit 130 grams of CO2 per kilometre (g/km) by 2015 and 95g/km by 2020. Companies providing technology solutions to car-makers confirm 95g can be met through conventional technology without the need to shift to electric or hydrogen powered vehicles.

Published on March 27, 2013 - 10:36

EU car emissions test ‘deceiving customers’

The gap between what cars emit in reality and what they are officially measured as emitting has grown to nearly a quarter, and continues to grow. A report by T&E says this gap and its growth is caused by car makers’ manipulation of testing procedures, and it explains how this is done. T&E says the current test regime is not fit for purpose, a new test should replace it by 2016, and follow-up checks should be carried out on cars to show their results are consistent with the official test results.

Published on March 24, 2013 - 14:01

Tired of Hot Air?

History has proved the car industry wrong – don’t let it happen again! This briefing document compares the car industry's claims with the realities of setting stricter CO2 emissions targets for cars.

Published on March 21, 2013 - 13:00

ICCT warns Commission on ‘weight v footprint’ debate

An international study has warned the EU that it risks getting an important detail wrong in plans to limit carbon dioxide emissions from new cars. The International Council for Clean Transportation (ICCT) says basing the EU’s emissions standards on the weight of a vehicle will make it much harder and more expensive to achieve targets and instead a vehicle’s ‘footprint’ should be the guiding factor. 

Published on March 18, 2013 - 11:01

Poland at a crossroads: The impact of CO2 and fuel economy regulation on Poland

In July 2012 the European Commission published its proposal on fuel efficiency and CO2 standards for new cars in the year 2020 (Review of Regulation 443/2009). The Commission proposes to reduce fuel consumption of new cars by almost 30% by 2020 to 3,8 l/100km (or 95g CO2/km). This proposal is currently being discussed by the Council and the European Parliament and is of singular importance to Poland.Poland is a country with a rapidly growing car fleet and a equally growing thirst for oil.

Published on March 15, 2013 - 17:23

Higher-than-advertised car fuel consumption due to carmakers’ manipulation of tests

The official fuel consumption measured in tests is now, on average, almost a quarter lower than that achieved on average by drivers on the road, a new report says. The report finds that this gap is growing and the principal cause is car manufacturers manipulating official tests.

Published on March 13, 2013 - 23:59

Pages