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Biofuels policies do increase food prices

Policies to promote food based biofuels do lead to increases in food prices, an extensive independent literature review has concluded. The analysis considered over one hundred economic modelling studies of the potential impact on prices of increased biofuel demand and over two dozen assessments of the role biofuels demand played in the 2006-08 food price crisis.

Published on September 14, 2017 - 16:11

Does sharing cars really reduce car use?

The average car sits unused for more than 90% of the time, carries on average just one and a half people and costs, on average, €6,500 a year to own and run. Each car occupies 150m2 of urban land and still this is not the full bill  – congestion costs the EU economy €100 billion annually. The convenience that made the car a 20th century icon has been eroded by its popularity.

Published on June 27, 2017 - 15:34

How the EU can better align spending with its climate and energy targets

The EU’s Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF) determines how EU money is spent. The current €1 trillion budget runs from 2014 to 2020 with almost €100 billion earmarked for investment in the transport sector. The current MFF Regulation states that “the Commission should present a proposal for a new multiannual financial framework before 1 January 2018”. This budget would most likely start from 2021.

Transport is the largest source of EU emissions and accounts for around a quarter of EU GHG emissions. Meanwhile air pollution from road transport contributes to over 400.000 premature deaths per year, 26.000 people die in traffic annually and the EU economy loses €100 billion every year in congestion. A large portion of the EU’s budget is currently spent on expanding road infrastructure and building up fossil fuel infrastructure (e.g. LNG terminals). A future EU budget should invest tax payers money more carefully, and prioritize investment in infrastructure that reduces the environmental impact of transport and assists member states in reaching their climate goals. In this paper T&E outlines how part of the post-2020 budget should be allocated.

Published on September 19, 2017 - 14:48

VECTO: Comparison of the conformity of aerodynamic resistance in Europe and the US

In the light of discussion on a new test procedure for truck CO2 emissions (VECTO), this study commissioned by T&E compares the test procedures in the US and EU to measure the aerodynamic resistance of trucks and what tolerances can be used. The research concludes that the 10% tolerance currently discussed for VECTO should clearly be adjusted downwards and therefore suggests a maximum tolerance of 5%.

Published on March 22, 2017 - 15:51

Implementing Act is crucial for improving the European rail market

This briefing outlines the need for EU legislation to deal with the issue of incumbent rail operators denying access to service facilities such as ticket machines or services desks for new market entrants. T&E welcomes the Commission’s proposal as it is important to improve the functioning of the railway market. We believe that this legislation could play a significant role in changing the dynamics of the European railway market and improving services for both passengers and shippers.

Published on December 13, 2016 - 12:07

Electrification strategy: a shift to sustainable e­-mobility

This paper sets out why a cross-vehicle, cross-modal strategy to accelerate the electrification of transport – a shift towards sustainable e-mobility – should be an essential part of Europe’s ambition to achieve an energy union. It would also bring the benefits of reduced oil imports and transport CO2 emissions as well as stimulate innovation and jobs.

Published on February 3, 2015 - 00:00

Including transport in the ETS: Counterproductive and legally questionable

This briefing summarises a legal analysis highlighting how the proposals are contrary to the requirements of the current ETS Directive. It also covers new research illustrating why including transport in the ETS would be counterproductive; compared with a scenario of ambitious post-2020 vehicle CO2 standards there would be 160,000 fewer jobs, and €22/77 billion higher oil imports in 2030/2050. Climate policy, as well as transport emissions reductions, would stall.

Published on October 20, 2014 - 16:31

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