Browse by topic: Publication, Air Pollution, Cars

Filters:

Stalemate fixing dirty diesels: Countries putting carmakers’ needs before those of citizens

This briefing outlines how, more than a year since the VW scandal broke and almost a year since the new reform of EU testing system was proposed, there is minimal progress to tackle the legacy of dirty diesel cars on the road. No action whatsoever has been taken to reduce the emissions of 80% of the most grossly emitting diesel cars. Out of the 20% of cars subject to some recalls. The briefing also outlines how the latest leaked documents reveal that the majority of member states are also trying to block and weaken any future reform on the newly proposed Type Approval Framework Regulation, stripping the Commission of any powers to do independent checks on in-use vehicles.

Published on November 29, 2016 - 10:05

Dieselgate: Who? What? How?

This report, released on the first anniversary of the Dieselgate scandal, exposes the shocking number of dirty diesel cars on the EU’s roads and the feeble regulation of cars by national authorities that have focused on protecting their own commercial interests or those of domestic carmakers. In the US, following the disclosure that VW had cheated emissions tests, justice has been swiftly and effectively delivered. This is in stark contrast to Europe where VW claims it has not acted illegally, no penalties have been levied and no compensation has been provided to customers.

Published on September 19, 2016 - 00:02

Road charging for cars: What the European Commission should do

T&E are calling on the Commission to promote distance-based charging for passenger cars in the upcoming review of the Eurovignette Directive. This position paper and summary briefing paper detail how charging road users for every kilometre that they drive can be a means to promote smarter transport behaviour and, if implemented correctly, increase the uptake of cleaner vehicles.

Published on May 5, 2017 - 10:19

For member states, Dieselgate never happened

It has been more than a year since the European Commission presented its type approval proposals (or TAFR) to reform the current system of vehicles testing following the Dieselgate scandal. Following extensive consideration by the European Parliament and Council of Ministers, the final negotiations to agree the changes are imminent. The Parliament voted its position on 4 April; the Council is expected to agree most technical details at a working group meeting on the 26 and 27 April and reach a final agreement at the Competitiveness Council on 29 May.

Published on April 25, 2017 - 14:00

Why MEPs should support an EU Vehicle Surveillance Agency

Following the Dieselgate emissions scandal, European policy-makers are currently discussing the reform of the EU vehicle testing system (or the Type Approval Framework Regulation - TAFR). This briefing outlines why the legislative proposal is a once-in-a-decade opportunity to fix today’s obsolete and ineffective way of checking that cars, vans, trucks and their parts and components meet EU safety and environmental standards.

Published on March 31, 2017 - 16:54

Italian action on Fiat shows why reform of EU testing system is urgently needed

T&E has got hold of Italy’s Dieselgate emissions investigation. The report proves that the home carmaker got special treatment, e.g. Fiat’s cars were tested in carmakers’ own labs and some even “exempted” from undergoing more demanding tests. This shows what is going to happen if type approval rules are not tightened up and all enforcement continues to sit with national authorities.

Published on February 8, 2017 - 10:14

Next round of Real-world Emissions tests: particulate emissions from gasoline direct injection cars

On 20 December the European Commission will meet with EU Member States in the Technical Committee on Motor Vehicles (TCMV) to agree the next milestone of the EU vehicle testing reform. The so-called RDE 3rd package extending the new on-road tests to particulate emissions from gasoline direct injection cars. It​​'s designed to tackle the problem of large numbers of ultrafine and highly damaging particles emitted from the new generation of gasoline engines. These particles penetrate deeply into human lungs and blood and contribute to the 467,000 deaths from air pollution annually according to the latest EEA figures. 

Published on December 15, 2016 - 16:03

Pages