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Europe's tax deals for diesel

The gap between petrol and diesel taxes in Europe is quite unique in the world and is the main reason why diesel engines have taken off in Europe and not worldwide. This study analyses fuel price and tax trends since 1980 and adds a specific analysis of diesel tax paid by trucks. It finds that in 2014 the gap in tax levels for diesel and petrol paid by motorists was €0.14/l, which is 30% lower than petrol per unit of energy or tonne of CO2.

Published on October 23, 2015 - 15:48

Mind the Gap 2015: Closing the chasm between test and real-world car CO2 emissions

The system of testing cars to measure fuel economy and CO2 emissions is utterly discredited. This report analyses the gap between test results and real-world performance and finds that it has become a chasm, increasing from 8% in 2001 to 31% in 2012 and 40% in 2014. Without action this gap will grow to nearly 50% by 2020. It also looks at which models have been found to have the biggest gap between claimed CO2 emissions and real-world performance.

Published on September 28, 2015 - 07:49

Don't Breathe Here: Tackling air pollution from vehicles

Every major car manufacturer is selling diesel cars that fail to meet EU air pollution limits on the road in Europe, according to data obtained by sustainable transport group Transport & Environment (T&E). All new diesel cars should have met the Euro 6 auto emissions standard from 1 September – but just one in 10 tested complied with the legal limit. (See infographic)

Published on September 14, 2015 - 09:00

How clean are Europe’s cars 2015

The EU set legally-binding targets for new cars to emit on average 130 grams of CO₂ per kilometre (g/km) by 2015 and 95g/km by 2021. This report, the 10th annual edition in the series by T&E, analyses the official data from the European Environment Agency on progress towards these targets made by carmakers in 2014. Click below to download the report and infographic.

Published on June 11, 2015 - 10:57

Cutting transport emissions under the 2030 effort sharing decision

This paper, as well as the attached explanatory briefing, attempts to quantify the challenge for EU member states in reducing transport emissions under the expected 2030 ‘effort sharing decision’ (ESD) and the extent to which CO2 standards for cars, vans and trucks can help achieve those targets. It makes very clear what the impacts are of mandating, or not, improved vehicle efficiency.

Published on May 18, 2015 - 15:12

Reasons to change the zero-rated criteria for biomass in the EU ETS

This study is published to co-inside with the European Commission's public consultation on revising the EU emissions trading system (ETS) for the period 2021-2030. The current EU ETS only accounts for smokestack emissions but erroneously rates the carbon emissions of biomass burning at zero. The study reviews the current use of biomass under the EU ETS and proposes steps to ensure that biomass use is only incentivised when it delivers real GHG emissions reductions.
Published on March 16, 2015 - 18:07

CO2 emissions from new cars in Europe: Country Ranking in 2013

This report is part of the eighth annual report T&E has published on progress in reducing CO2 emissions and improving the fuel efficiency of cars. This document focuses on average new car emissions in different Member States and highlights the effectiveness (or otherwise) of their different taxation policies in encouraging the purchase of lower carbon cars. In 2013, the top six best performing countries all achieved annual emissions reductions of new cars of more than 5% (Netherlands, Greece, Slovenia, France, Finland and Bulgaria). In contrast the laggards, including Sweden and Poland, achieved less than 2.5% improvement in average CO₂ emissions from 2012.

Published on December 17, 2014 - 09:39

Analysis finds EU-Canada trade deal would unleash wave of investor lawsuits

This first in-depth analysis of investor rights in the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) with Canada by T&E and 14 other environmental NGOs, citizens’ groups and workers unions from both sides of the Atlantic finds that CETA grants even greater rights to foreign investors than the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) – increasing the risk that corporations will use CETA to constrain future government policy. It would unleash a wave of corporate lawsuits against Canada, the EU and its member states, particularly in the mining and financial sectors.

Published on November 18, 2014 - 17:54

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