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Would you forgo a glass of wine to protect the Arctic and our climate?

It would cost passengers just the price of a glass of wine a day if cruise ships would stop burning highly polluting heavy fuel oil (HFO) in the fragile Arctic environment. That’s according to a new report from green transport group Transport & Environment which analysed the impact on the cruise ship MS Rotterdam had it switched to marine gas oil (MGO) [1] during three summer trips to the Arctic in 2018.

Published on October 10, 2018 - 06:00

Europe has capacity to recycle its ships, new data shows – yet shipowners want to use dangerous, polluting yards abroad

Ship-recycling yards approved by the EU will have enough capacity to handle demand from EU-flagged ships that need to be scrapped, a new analysis shows. The shipping industry wants low-cost ship ‘breaking’ yards outside the EU – with dangerous working conditions and poor environmental standards – to be added to the EU list of approved facilities in order to meet demand from vessels bound by the bloc’s ship recycling law, which enters force on 1 January 2019. But the current EU list can accommodate the numbers and sizes of EU-flagged ships that are scrapped every year, the new report by NGOs Shipbreaking Platform and Transport & Environment (T&E) shows.

Published on September 24, 2018 - 07:00

International coalition wants Carnival to stop using heavy fuel oil on cruise ships in Arctic

As Carnival Corporation’s first ships of the season arrive in the Arctic, an international coalition of environmental groups has joined together to call on the cruise giant to stop using one of the world’s cheapest and dirtiest fossil fuels — heavy fuel oil — on ships traveling in fragile Arctic and sub-Arctic waters. The petition is at cleanupcarnival.com and will be delivered to Carnival Corporation CEO Arnold Donald at the company’s headquarters.

Published on July 9, 2018 - 10:18

Natural gas is a $22bn distraction for EU shipping that won’t decarbonise the sector – study

Rolling out liquified natural gas (LNG) infrastructure for shipping in Europe would cost $22 billion and deliver, at best, a 6% reduction in ship greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 compared to the replaced diesel, a new independent study for Transport & Environment (T&E) by the UMAS consultancy finds.[1] To date Europe has spent half a billion US dollars on LNG infrastructure for refuelling ships.

Published on June 25, 2018 - 17:53

Commitment to decarbonise shipping is welcome – governments can no longer shirk decisions on how to cut ship GHG emissions

Statement from Clean Shipping CoalitionToday’s commitment by governments to require international shipping to decarbonise and at least halve its greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 is a welcome and potentially game changing development, the Clean Shipping Coalition (CSC) has said. But the lack of any clear plan of action to deliver the emissions reductions, including urgently needed short-term measures, is a major concern, according to the group of NGOs[1] with observer status at the UN’s International Maritime Organisation (IMO).

Published on April 13, 2018 - 11:05

Shipping climate talks hit heavy weather as UN agency’s credibility tested

The first difficult week of talks on an interim greenhouse gas strategy for shipping saw little progress towards a final outcome with some deep divisions and much work remaining, sustainable transport group Transport & Environment (T&E) has said. EU states and a ‘high ambition’ coalition called for countries meeting at the International Maritime Organisation to agree emissions reduction targets that are compatible with the Paris agreement. But progress was blocked by a vocal minority composed of developing and flag states.

Published on April 6, 2018 - 18:23

Shipping industry sells out on Paris agreement on eve of UN talks

A call by the shipping industry [1] for governments to compromise on ambition ahead of key UN discussions to reduce maritime emissions actually abandons the goals of the Paris agreement, sustainable transport group Transport & Environment (T&E) has said. The International Maritime Organisation (IMO) meets from 3-13 April to adopt an initial greenhouse gas (GHG) strategy for the shipping sector.

Published on March 29, 2018 - 14:39

EU governments’ support for 70-100% shipping emissions cut welcomed

EU member states’ decision to support a 70-100% reduction in maritime greenhouse gas emissions worldwide by 2050, compared to 2008 levels, has been welcomed by sustainable transport group Transport & Environment (T&E). However, pressure from the major EU shipping nations saw the EU’s common position, agreed last Friday, being made less firm and more aspirational than what the high-ambition EU countries and environmental groups initially called for. [1] The member states will attend a meeting of the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) from 3-13 April to adopt an initial GHG strategy for the shipping sector.

Published on March 26, 2018 - 15:40

Europe’s top shipping nations among worst in IMO maritime climate talks – ranking

European ambition to clean up the shipping sector’s greenhouse gas emissions is being led by Germany, Belgium and France, a new ranking shows. The top three, followed by the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, and then the UK, Denmark, Luxembourg and Finland, were the most active in pushing for an effective climate plan to be agreed by the International Maritime Organisation (IMO), the UN’s shipping body. The ranking, based on written and oral submissions to the IMO by EU countries, was compiled by sustainable transport NGO Transport & Environment (T&E).

Published on March 22, 2018 - 10:20

IMO moves to outlaw carriage of high sulphur marine fuel ahead of 2020 usage ban

Moves to close a loophole in enforcement of the cap on high-sulphur marine fuel, which comes into effect in January 2020, have been welcomed by the Clean Shipping Coalition (CSC). Ships will be banned at that time from burning any marine fuel with a sulphur content above 0.5%, but the ban does not prevent ships from carrying fuel exceeding the 0.5% limit. This opens up the possibility of massive avoidance by unscrupulous operators when operating out of sight on the high seas.

Published on February 9, 2018 - 14:20

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