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Four countries back truck CO2 limits, as lorries rival cars in share of emissions

Four EU countries have called for mandatory fuel economy standards for trucks, documents reveal – as new research by sustainable transport group Transport & Environment (T&E) projects heavy-duty vehicles (HDVs) will almost overtake cars as the biggest source of road transport emissions by 2030. CO2 emissions are directly related to the fuel economy of internal-combustion vehicles, with more fuel-efficient vehicles emitting less greenhouse gas.

Too big to ignore – truck CO2 emissions in 2030

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Emissions from heavy-duty vehicles (HDV), which include trucks and buses, increased by 36% between 1990 and 2010 and continue to grow. HDV emissions currently represent around 30% of all road transport CO2 emissions and 5% of all EU CO2 emissions. This briefing by T&E analyses existing data and finds that unless additional measures are taken HDV emissions will increase to 40% of road transport emissions by 2030.

Truck fuel-economy standards needed, says German environment agency

Germany’s federal environment agency, UBA, has backed calls for truck fuel efficiency standards, saying ‘a much more intensive discussion about CO2 standards for heavy goods vehicles’ and ‘ambitious regulation’ are required. Citing ever-greater volumes of goods being transported by road and the trend towards more powerful and heavier vehicles, the agency said the transport sector must step up its efforts on climate action.

America’s challenge to European truck supremacy

When people think about American trucks, the image that springs to mind is a massive Coca-Cola truck with a big nose. These massive rigs don’t seem particularly efficient and for a long time Europeans made fun of the big-nosed US mammoths. Some European manufacturers even boasted about how they sold out-dated technology in the US. This is about to change.

Transport industry and green groups join forces to inject competition into truck fuel efficiency

The International Road Union, The European Express Association, Leaseurope, CLECAT, Green Freight Europe, The Northern Logistics Association, European Transport Board and Transport & Environment call on the European Commission to give a much-needed boost to competition on truck fuel efficiency, in a letter sent today to Commission officials.

Hauliers and NGOs demand a transparent CO2 test to boost truck fuel efficiency - Letter

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In this letter, Europe's hauliers association (IRU), European logistics and forwarding associations (CLECAT, European Transport Board, Nordic Logistics Association), EU vehicle leasing and rental organisation (Leaseurope), European Express Association, Green Freight Europe and T&E urge the European Commission to propose a truck and bus CO2 test (known as VECTO) that is transparent, cost-effective and easy to use for third parties, with simulated results than can be verified through a form of testing for real-world compliance. The signatories of the letter also call on the Commission to propose a test that enables small road transport companies (85% of the fleet) to independently consult and compare different vehicle combinations, CO2, fuel consumption and energy use, where possible online. The new test must “remove market barriers by increasing market transparency and vehicle comparability thus stimulating competition among manufacturers and end-user awareness” as the Commission set out to do in its May 2014 truck CO2 strategy.This page also includes a downloadable discussion paper on confidential input date for VECTO.The Commission has developed a test procedure called VECTO to measure CO2 emissions from new trucks and buses. The VECTO test procedure is a simulation tool that aims to provide truck and buses buyers with accurate fuel consumption information. The details of the test procedure are currently being discussed in a DG GROWTH expert committee and the final legislative proposal is expected in mid-2016. 

Explanatory note: Comparing US and EU truck fuel economy

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In June 2015, the US Environmental Protection Agency announced phase II of fuel efficiency standards for medium and heavy-duty trucks, intended to reduce planet-warming carbon pollution. In the US tractor-trailers average between 33-36l/100km. The new proposal will bring that down to below 27l/100km by 2027. This explanatory note details how US trucks will overtake European lorries as the most efficient in the world.

US unveils new lorry fuel economy target; EU left for dust – again

Today's announcement by US authorities of a target to improve lorry fuel efficiency by 24% by 2027, on top of limits announced in 2011, is a wake-up call to the EU which has failed to regulate heavy-duty vehicles' CO2 emissions. Europe currently only plans to introduce a monitoring scheme.