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Member state biofuel plans will cause higher emissions than fossil fuels

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The use of biofuels in EU transport will emit between 81% and 167% more greenhouse gases than fossil fuels and require an area twice the size of Belgium in new land to grow biofuel crops. That is the latest evidence concerning the environmental impact of biofuels, which was published earlier this month. As the findings are based on EU member states’ plans for increasing use of biofuels and the most recent science on indirect land use change, this study carries more weight than previous studies on the impact of biofuels published up to now.

New research warns of massive increase in carbon emissions and land conversion caused by EU biofuels policy

Plans to increase the use of biofuels in Europe over the next ten years will require up to 69 000 square kilometres of new land worldwide and make climate change worse, a new study reveals today [1].

Anticipated Indirect Land Use Change Associated with Expanded Use of Biofuels in the EU

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This study estimates the environmental impact of Indirect Land Use Change (ILUC) associated with the increased use of conventional biofuels that EU Member States have planned for within their National Renewable Energy Action Plans (NREAPs).

EU classifies tar sands a 'high greenhouse gas' source but makes concession to Canada

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Canada has achieved a partial victory over the EU on the issue of how the environmental impact of transport fuels derived from tar sands should be assessed. The Commission has agreed to delay by a year the greenhouse gas intensity value it gives to tar sands, but it has made clear it views the fuel as a ‘high greenhouse gas intensity’ source.

Biofuel production is causing ‘land grab’ says World Bank

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The World Bank has admitted that the European and American biofuel targets are encouraging a rush for land in Africa and other developing regions that is reducing the amount of land available for growing food. The finding adds to growing concerns about indirect land-use change caused by biofuel production, and comes as the Commission has launched a consultation about such biofuel impacts.