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Lower carbon fossil fuels: big benefits, low administrative costs

Sketch of a book (default image for publications

This is a summary of the report issued by CE Delft in March 2012, investigating into the extra cost that the implementing measures of the Fuel Quality Directive would imply for the oil industry and for the whole supply chain.

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Report on the administrative burden of the Fuel Quality Directive

Sketch of a book (default image for publications

This report investigates into the extra cost that the implementing measures of the Fuel Quality Directive - if they are adopted according to the proposal of the European Commission - will imply for the oil industry and for the whole supply chain. It finds out that - for a typical 50-litre fuel fill-up - the added cost for consumer would be of half a Eurocent.

Study debunks oil industry claim that new fuel law would kill refineries

The oil industry’s claim that a new EU law designed to cut emissions from petrol and diesel production would impose a ‘disproportionate administrative burden’ has been debunked by a new report (1). A study carried out by three consultancies (CE Delft, Carbon Matters and Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands) found that the administrative and reporting costs of new implementing rules for the EU’s Fuel Quality Directive would costs drivers less than half a cent on an average fill-up, or around 1 cent on a barrel of crude oil. Transport & Environment is calling for EU Member States to press ahead with approving the new rules without further delay.

EU-wide car labelling

Fuel efficiency chart (credit: LowCVP.org)

A new study has recommended Europe should have a single fuel economy and carbon dioxide labelling system for cars. The study by the British consultancy AEA looked at the labelling systems in operation in eight member states, and found some compare a car with the whole car market while others show only how it compares with others of the same type. It says comparisons against the whole of the available car fleet are likely to be more useful in the absence of further research. Another report in 2010 also recommended a harmonised approach to labelling.

Opposition that risks having no clean future for liquid transport fuels

Jos Dings, Director T&E

Opinion by Jos Dings - T&E director
People who follow our work – and Europe’s environmental policy – a little bit will have noticed that two fuels-related draft laws keep dragging on without any apparent progress. The first one is what to do about indirect land use change effects of biofuels (key words: Iluc, biodiesel). The second is whether or not to give petrol and diesel from unconventional fossil sources a higher lifecycle greenhouse gas default value (key words: fuel quality directive, tar sands).

Assessing grandfathering options under an EU ILUC policy

This report investigates how grandfathering provisions for exising biofuels production in the Renewable Energy Directive (RED) can be best implemented to minimise damage to the environment.  The consultants also considered the economic and political implications of the various options examined. 

‘This must be the most researched subject in the EU’s history!’

Two new reports are expected to put more pressure on the Commission over its biofuels policy. Both add to the growing bank of evidence that under current policies, changes in land use caused by growing biofuels crops will wipe out the climate benefits of using certain biofuels, especially in the case of biodiesel.

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