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Failure in test checking caused false fuel economy claims

A blog by the International Council on Clean Transportation (ICCT) says a recent case in America, in which the Korean car makers Hyundai and Kia overstated the fuel efficiency of some of their cars, was caused by a failure to properly check manufacturers’ claims and has lessons for the whole world.

Ultralow carbon vehicles and supercredits

In 2009, the EU set legally-binding targets for new cars to emit 130 grams of carbon dioxide (CO2) per kilometer (g/km) by 2015 and 95g/km in 2020.1 The Commission recently proposed a review of the way the 2020 target should be met.2 This confirmed the 95g/km value but reintroduced supercredits (additional rewards for sales of ultralow carbon vehicles) that weaken the target. This paper outlines why and how the market for ultralow carbon cars should be supported without reducing the wider benefits of improving the efficiency of conventional cars.

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Commission bends to car industry pressure

EC plan for a 2020 competitive car and lorry industry omits key environmental promises.The Commission’s Cars 2020 Action Plan (1) for a competitive and sustainable automotive industry in Europe announced today fails to address key strategic challenges such as climate change. Sustainable transport campaigners, Transport & Environment (T&E), have identified important omissions from the plans. This follows earlier announcements this week that other key policies to reduce the environmental impact of vehicles are being shelved.

Tyre label has vital lessons for fuel efficiency in road and air transport

Opinion by Nina Renshaw - T&E deputy director There aren’t many downsides to working at T&E, but if I have to name one, it is that we don’t often have the joy of seeing the fruits of our work in the real world. Mostly you don’t see less energy use or fewer emissions, and you see even fewer economic incentives at work when walking around town. So 1 November will be a rare moment.

Low-carbon cars can boost Europe’s economy

The idea that making cars cleaner would be bad for jobs and competitiveness is a myth. That is the conclusion from a report launched by T&E that looks into the economic consequences for carmakers to meet strict carbon dioxide emissions limits from 2020 and beyond. T&E says it strengthens the argument for an 80g/km target for 2020 and a 60g target for 2025.

Low carbon cars create new jobs in Europe, report says

Fuel efficient vehicles are good for EU employment, drivers, economy and the planet. Over 100,000 new manufacturing jobs could be created in Europe by investing in the development and manufacturing of fuel efficient technologies to make cars greener, a new report published today (1) by Transport & Environment (T&E), the sustainable transport campaigners, says. The report, conducted by the Dutch consultancy CE Delft, dispels industry’s claims that reducing CO2 emissions from cars would have a negative impact on automotive jobs and competitiveness in Europe. It also highlights that money saved through using less fuel increases consumers’ disposable income, which in turn creates extra jobs across the EU economy.

Low Carbon Vehicles: Good for EU Employment

This briefing paper, and the supporting report upon which it is based, fill the evidence gap about the employment effects of lower carbon vehicles. They summarise a review of published literature undertaken by CE Delft.

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CE Delft literature review on employment impacts of GHG reduction policies for transport

Sketch of a book (default image for publications

Recently a large number of studies have been published that claim that accelerated uptake of electrical vehicles (EVs) and fuel efficient cars in the market for automotive transport may have positive employment benefits.

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