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Peugeot Citroën lands top award for fuel-efficient cars

Have you ever wondered which car brand makes the most fuel-efficient cars? The award in 2014 goes to Peugeot Citroën with cars averaging 4.5 litres per 100km (110g CO2/km) – making it the lowest carbon carmaker. This is a key finding of the 10th edition, of ‘How clean are Europe’s cars?’ by sustainable transport group Transport & Environment (T&E), which annually tracks progress made by carmakers to reduce fuel consumption and CO2 emissions of new cars.

Aviation competitiveness submission

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T&E provided a detailed submission to the European Commission's public consultation on aviation competitiveness, which closed on 10 June 2015. T&E's response to this consultation is to call for the EU to adopt measures that create a more efficient aviation sector, making EU operators the market leaders globally. This includes adopting the most effective environmental standards possible, ending inefficient subsidies to operators and airports and adopting a common EU negotiating position for air service agreements to prevent excess capacity in the European market. With aviation emissions projected to grow considerably by 2030, such measures are necessary to meet the EU's ambitious climate objectives.

How clean are Europe’s cars 2015

The EU set legally-binding targets for new cars to emit on average 130 grams of CO₂ per kilometre (g/km) by 2015 and 95g/km by 2021. This report, the 10th annual edition in the series by T&E, analyses the official data from the European Environment Agency on progress towards these targets made by carmakers in 2014. Click below to download the report and infographic.

‘EU should work with US on aircraft emissions after EPA ruling’

The US Environment Protection Agency (EPA) has announced today that emissions from aircraft endanger human health, after being forced to issue a ruling due to a lawsuit filed by a number of US environmental groups. The EPA already found that greenhouse gases (GHGs) from cars and power plants were harmful to public health because of their climate impact.

Letter to European Commission and ministers on why Europe must push for an environmentally effective ICAO CO2 standard

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Ahead of the crucial meetings of the UN aviation body, ICAO, in July 2015 and again in February 2016 and at its assembly in October 2016, Aviation Environment Federation (AEF) and T&E are calling on Europe to push for an environmentally effective ICAO CO2 standard. In this letter to EU climate and transport ministers and European Commissioners Miguel Arias Cañete and Violeta Bulc, the two groups say the EU and the US need to work together to ensure a standard that actually reduces emissions. Otherwise the two markets should work together on their own standard, since they are over half of the global market.

Road to 2030: how EU vehicle efficiency standards help member states meet climate targets

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This paper attempts to quantify the challenge for EU member states in reducing transport emissions under the expected 2030 ‘effort sharing decision’ and the extent to which CO2 standards for cars, vans and trucks can help achieve those targets.

Vehicle fuel efficiency standards can help EU countries halve their climate obligations from transport – study

Europe can only meet the climate targets Heads of State agreed on for sectors outside the Emissions Trading System (ETS) if it sets fuel efficiency standards for new cars, vans and lorries by 2025 or earlier, a new study by Transport & Environment (T&E) reveals [1]. In a middle-of-the-road scenario where transport would cut CO2 emissions by 30% by 2030 [2], the study found that CO2 standards for all vehicles (cars, vans and lorries) in 2025 and 2030 would deliver a whopping 42% of the emissions reduction required from transport. 

Diesel machines need the cleanest technology to relieve our choking cities

As air pollution spikes in Europe’s cities prompt car-free days and talk of banning diesel cars, it’s easy to forget the other culprits behind the air quality crisis: diesel machines. Known in legislation by the innocuous term ‘non-road mobile machinery’, their air pollutant emission limits are now finally under revision.

Can Google, Uber, BlaBlaCar and Zipcar make mobility cleaner?

Transport is not the most innovative of sectors so when the top people of Uber, Google, Nokia, Zipcar and BlaBlaCar got together at the International Transport Forum in Leipzig last week, there was an air of excitement. The picture they painted was of a radically different transport system, revolutionized by the internet, mobile phones and autonomous, electric driving. What this could mean for people was captured well by Philippe Crist from the OECD. He estimates the advent of the digital age could reduce the number of cars by an eye-popping 90% in urban areas.

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