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COP21: Shipping and aviation emissions are the elephants in the room

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Aviation emissions are responsible for 5% of global warming and shipping makes up almost 3% of global CO2. These sectors have a CO2 impact equal to the UK and Germany and are continuing to grow rapidly – by up to 270% in 2050, by which time they could account for almost 40% of all emissions. Such emission growth will undermine reductions efforts by all countries and other sectors, effectively making the 1.5/2°C objective impossible to achieve.

Letter to UN on aviation and shipping emissions in the draft Paris Agreement

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In this letter, the Clean Shipping Coalition and the International Coalition for Sustainable Aviation highlight the absence of emissions from international aviation and shipping from the draft Paris COP21 agreement. They call on the UN leadership to act immediately with Parties to the UNFCCC to ensure that the language in previous drafts on aviation and shipping emissions is reinstated - these sectors must adopt credible targets and measures. International aviation and shipping emissions are growing rapidly, and their exclusion will critically undermine efforts to limit a temperature increase to 1.5/2 degrees.

Letter to EU Ministers and Climate Commissioner on omission of bunkers from draft Paris agreement

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In this letter, T&E and 16 other groups highlight the absence of emissions from international aviation and shipping from the draft Paris COP21 agreement. they call on EU Ministers for climate change and Commissioner Arias Cañete to act immediately with other states to ensure that the language in previous drafts on aviation and shipping emissions is reinstated.

New South Wales's sulphur fuel requirements for cruise ships

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The following submission is in support of the introduction by the state government of New South Wales in Australia of stricter sulphur content requirements in marine fuels used by cruise ships entering Sydney Harbour and berthed at the White Bay cruise ship terminal, aimed at reducing emissions. Residents living close to the terminal have been complaining about the effects of air pollution from cruise ships calling at the terminal and this lead to a public consultation.

Analysis of estimated index values of ships that have entered the fleet since 2009

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There is little publicly available information on how the design efficiency of ships that have entered the fleet since 2009 has developed. The IMO has published the energy efficiency design index (EEDI) of a limited number of ships launched since 2012, but the sample of ships is small and the time period limited. The published data show clearly, however, that estimated index values (EIV) and EEDIs of ships are well correlated.

Shipping emissions – the final EU climate frontier

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On 28 April 2015, the European Parliament was expected to ratify a Monitoring, Reporting and Verification (MRV) regulation for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shipping. This briefing details how shipping emissions have increased by approximately 70% since 1990 and the EU's track record on cutting these emissions. Under current policies, the IMO's GHG study forecasts shipping CO2 emissions to increase by 50% to 250% by 2050, which would then represent between 6% to 14% of total global emissions. While emissions from other sectors have started declining or are looking to peak in 2020, none of the “business as usual” scenarios for shipping foresee a decline in shipping emissions before 2050. The EU has promised measures for shipping emissions three times since 2009 and the Commission’s communication on Energy Union made it clear that all sources of emissions should contribute to the EU 2030 reduction target.

Study of historical trends in ship design efficiency

This first-time study of the historical development of the efficiency of new ships shows that, in fact, the efficiency of new ships has actually deteriorated since 1990 by 10% on average. This demonstrates the failure of market forces to reduce ship and shipping emissions and emphasizes the need for regulation.

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