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EU biofuels reform – endgame for bad biofuels

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On 28 April 2015, the European Parliament was expected to adopt a final compromise for the reform of EU biofuels policy that would then be endorsed by the Council of the EU. This briefing outlines how, after several years of difficult discussions, this compromise lacks the necessary ambition to tackle properly the issue of indirect land-use change (ILUC). However, it sets some key principles for the phase-out of first-generation biofuels, recognises the problem of ILUC emissions and introduces new measures for other alternatives such as advanced biofuels and renewable electricity. T&E stresses that these elements will need to be captured in the 2030 transport fuels policies.

Reasons to change the zero-rated criteria for biomass in the EU ETS

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This study is published to co-inside with the European Commission's public consultation on revising the EU emissions trading system (ETS) for the period 2021-2030. The current EU ETS only accounts for smokestack emissions but erroneously rates the carbon emissions of biomass burning at zero. The study reviews the current use of biomass under the EU ETS and proposes steps to ensure that biomass use is only incentivised when it delivers real GHG emissions reductions.

Electrification strategy: a shift to sustainable e­-mobility

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This paper sets out why a cross-vehicle, cross-modal strategy to accelerate the electrification of transport – a shift towards sustainable e-mobility – should be an essential part of Europe’s ambition to achieve an energy union. It would also bring the benefits of reduced oil imports and transport CO2 emissions as well as stimulate innovation and jobs.

NGOs write to Commission on electrification of transport within a European Energy Union

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Ahead of the Communication on the European Energy Union with a forward-looking climate policy, NGOs wrote to the College of the European Commission asking it to pay special attention to the decarbonisation of transport. They ask commissioners to include a comprehensive strategy for electrification of transport as one of their priorities for moving Europe further down the road of climate and energy security and towards reducing its global land foot-print.

Industry, Cities and T&E's letter on electrification of transport within EU's Energy Union

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Ahead of its discussion on the EU’s key priorities for the next decade, seven stakeholder organisations from industry, transport and cities wrote to the College of the European Commission regarding the creation of a European Energy Union with a forward-looking climate change policy. They called on the commissioners to focus on the transport sector, which represents about a third of the EU’s overall energy consumption and is almost exclusively dependent on imported fossil fuels.

The revised FQD: weakened proposal must still be implemented

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This briefing looks at the main features of the 2014 proposal too implement Article 7a of the Fuel Quality Directive (FQD). Despite weakening – due to intense lobbying by the Canadian and US governments and oil companies – some of the elements of the 2014 proposal are worth implementing and strengthening, such as the new reporting of crude oil imports by market crude oil names (MCONs). In addition, the 2014 proposal gives fuel suppliers new ways to meet the FQD target, such as promoting low-carbon electricity used in transport.

Civil society and industry urge Barroso to maintain the Fuel Quality Directive post-2020

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Ahead of the publication of the EU's Climate and Energy Strategy for 2030, civil society organisations and industry wrote to Commission President José Manuel Barroso urging him to maintain the Fuel Quality Directive as an important tool in the post-2020 decarbonisation framework. They called on the Commission to produce a proper impact assessment and initiate a public consultation on how this policy should be improved and continued.

Las arenas bituminosas y la Directiva sobre la Calidad de los Combustibles

Lo que es: La Directiva relativa a la Calidad de los Combustibles (FQD) establece para 2020 el objetivo de reducir en un 6% las emisiones de carbono de combustibles de transporte. Se trata de un objetivo acorde a la neutralidad tecnológica que deja a la industria una gama de opciones para cumplirlo de la forma económicamente más rentable. Una de estas formas es suministrando combustibles alternativos bajos en carbono como los biocombustibles sostenibles o la electricidad limpia.

Lo que no es: La propuesta de la Comisión de implementar la FQD asigna la intensidad de carbono a todas las materias primas de combustibles fósiles, concretamente, las arenas bituminosas, el carbón líquido, los esquistos bituminosos, el gas licuado y el petróleo convencional. NO discrimina los recursos según su localización geográfica; sólo se trata de la intensidad de carbono de cada fuente de combustible. Conforme a esta propuesta, los esquistos bituminosos tienen un valor de intensidad de carbono más alto que las arenas bituminosas. El «valor predeterminado» para las arenas bituminosas NO sólo está establecido para el petróleo canadiense, sino también para todos los combustibles que provengan de arenas bituminosas de cualquier parte del mundo, incluyendo Venezuela, Rusia, Madagascar y los EE.UU.

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