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NGO recommendations for upstream emissions reductions in the Fuel Quality Directive

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The recently adopted implementing rules for the Fuel Quality Directive (FQD) include the possibility for fuel suppliers to use upstream emissions reductions (UERs) to reach the 6% decarbonisation target. This briefing contains T&E's recommendations for European Commission guidelines on UERs under the FQD. It outlines how the rules are vague and, without robust guidance by the European Commission and restrictions by member states, there is a risk of double counted and non-additional offset credits being used for compliance, seriously undermining the FQD’s effectiveness.

T&E responses to consultation on an EU strategy for LNG and gas storage

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In July 2015 the European Commission opened a public consulation on an EU strategy for liquefied natural gas and gas storage. In its response T&E state that natural gas cannot deliver the decarbonisation that the sector needs to achieve the EU climate goals up to 2050. Investing in this technology would divert necessary resources from truly low-carbon alternatives in the transport sector and would create lock-in effects. Public resources for energy transition in transport should go where it offers the greatest public benefits, improved efficiency, and sustainable electrification.

Submission on a CO2 standard for new aircraft

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An efficiency standard is a key element of ICAO’s basket of measures and is intended to deliver emissions reductions beyond business-as-usual. But on current indications the ICAO standard for new aircraft types will not affect any new aircraft types and will only cover 5% of the world fleet in 2030. In this submission T&E outlines its position that the EPA should ensure that any standard adopted ensures efficiency improvements that go beyond business-as-usual.

Mind the Gap 2015: Closing the chasm between test and real-world car CO2 emissions

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The system of testing cars to measure fuel economy and CO2 emissions is utterly discredited. This report analyses the gap between test results and real-world performance and finds that it has become a chasm, increasing from 8% in 2001 to 31% in 2012 and 40% in 2014. Without action this gap will grow to nearly 50% by 2020. It also looks at which models have been found to have the biggest gap between claimed CO2 emissions and real-world performance.

The VW scandal and what does it mean for TTIP?

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Unless you have buried your head in the sand over the last couple of days, you would have been hard pressed to miss the VW cheating scandal that has erupted in the United States. A tsunami of media stories have taken over the front pages of the FT, NYT, The Guardian, Le Figaro, Il Sole 24 Ore, to name a few.

Too big to ignore – truck CO2 emissions in 2030

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Emissions from heavy-duty vehicles (HDV), which include trucks and buses, increased by 36% between 1990 and 2010 and continue to grow. HDV emissions currently represent around 30% of all road transport CO2 emissions and 5% of all EU CO2 emissions. This briefing by T&E analyses existing data and finds that unless additional measures are taken HDV emissions will increase to 40% of road transport emissions by 2030.

Briefing: Environmental Goods Agreement

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Launched in July 2014, the Environmental Goods Agreement (EGA) is being negotiated between the European Union – on behalf of its 28 member states – and 16 other members of the World Trade Organisation (WTO). The selection of goods for the EGA list was undertaken in secrecy and without a definition of an environmental good or selection criteria. T&E has identified around 120 items on the list of 650 goods for which we do not see any environmental justification for lowering tariffs. We argue that negotiations should open up and the assessment of what is an environmental good should be conducted by recognised experts in full transparency, on the basis of a widely accepted methodology.

Hauliers and NGOs demand a transparent CO2 test to boost truck fuel efficiency - Letter

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In this letter, Europe's hauliers association (IRU), European logistics and forwarding associations (CLECAT, European Transport Board, Nordic Logistics Association), EU vehicle leasing and rental organisation (Leaseurope), European Express Association, Green Freight Europe and T&E urge the European Commission to propose a truck and bus CO2 test (known as VECTO) that is transparent, cost-effective and easy to use for third parties, with simulated results than can be verified through a form of testing for real-world compliance. The signatories of the letter also call on the Commission to propose a test that enables small road transport companies (85% of the fleet) to independently consult and compare different vehicle combinations, CO2, fuel consumption and energy use, where possible online. The new test must “remove market barriers by increasing market transparency and vehicle comparability thus stimulating competition among manufacturers and end-user awareness” as the Commission set out to do in its May 2014 truck CO2 strategy.This page also includes a downloadable discussion paper on confidential input date for VECTO.The Commission has developed a test procedure called VECTO to measure CO2 emissions from new trucks and buses. The VECTO test procedure is a simulation tool that aims to provide truck and buses buyers with accurate fuel consumption information. The details of the test procedure are currently being discussed in a DG GROWTH expert committee and the final legislative proposal is expected in mid-2016. 

Collusion to weaken fuel economy regulations

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The current system for testing car CO2 emissions and fuel economy, the NEDC, is obsolete. Thankfully, a new test, the WLTP, is scheduled to replace the NEDC in 2017. To do this, the average CO2 emissions target for cars (95 g/km for 2020/1) needs to be revised in a way that maintains “equivalent stringency” between the tests.

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