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Industry, Cities and T&E's letter on electrification of transport within EU's Energy Union

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Ahead of its discussion on the EU’s key priorities for the next decade, seven stakeholder organisations from industry, transport and cities wrote to the College of the European Commission regarding the creation of a European Energy Union with a forward-looking climate change policy. They called on the commissioners to focus on the transport sector, which represents about a third of the EU’s overall energy consumption and is almost exclusively dependent on imported fossil fuels.

CO2 emissions from new cars in Europe: Country Ranking in 2013

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This report is part of the eighth annual report T&E has published on progress in reducing CO2 emissions and improving the fuel efficiency of cars. This document focuses on average new car emissions in different Member States and highlights the effectiveness (or otherwise) of their different taxation policies in encouraging the purchase of lower carbon cars. In 2013, the top six best performing countries all achieved annual emissions reductions of new cars of more than 5% (Netherlands, Greece, Slovenia, France, Finland and Bulgaria). In contrast the laggards, including Sweden and Poland, achieved less than 2.5% improvement in average CO₂ emissions from 2012.

Hauliers and T&E's open letter to decision-makers on lorry weights and dimensions proposal

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Ahead of trilogue negotiations on the European Commission's lorry weights and dimensions proposal, the International Road Transport Union (IRU), representing hauliers, and Transport & Environment wrote to the Commission, Council and Parliament. In the letter they urge decision-makers to seize a once-in-a-generation opportunity to support and enable a maximisation of lorry fuel efficiency which will reduce emissions, while creating opportunities to further improve safety and driver comfort. They ask the decision-makers to reject a proposed moratorium and not delay such innovations any further.

The revised FQD: weakened proposal must still be implemented

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This briefing looks at the main features of the 2014 proposal too implement Article 7a of the Fuel Quality Directive (FQD). Despite weakening – due to intense lobbying by the Canadian and US governments and oil companies – some of the elements of the 2014 proposal are worth implementing and strengthening, such as the new reporting of crude oil imports by market crude oil names (MCONs). In addition, the 2014 proposal gives fuel suppliers new ways to meet the FQD target, such as promoting low-carbon electricity used in transport.

2014 Mind the Gap report: manipulation of fuel economy test results by carmakers

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This paper details how the current system of testing cars to measure fuel economy and CO2 emissions is not fit for purpose. The gap between test results and real-world performance has become a chasm, increasing from 8% in 2001 to 31% in 2013 for private motorists. Mercedes cars have the biggest gap between test and real world performance, and less than 20% of the improvement in emissions measured in tests of Opel/Vauxhall cars is realised on the road.

Realistic real-world driving emissions tests: a last chance for diesel cars?

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Air pollution emissions limits for cars, vans and trucks (Euro Standards) have been progressively tightened, on paper, over 25 years but have failed to deliver real-world improvements for several key pollutants, notably nitrogen dioxide. This is because obsolete tests and “cycle beating” techniques have been used by carmakers leading to levels of emissions from some cars many times higher on the road than in laboratory tests. In October 2014, the Commission will be discussing progress and next steps with EU member states. This paper outlines key issues for member states to ensure that the new real-world (PEMS) tests are robust and representative of real-world driving in order for emissions to decline on the road. 

Ending lorries' deadly track record: a matter of (direct) vision

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Lorries are involved in 4,200 fatal accidents in Europe every year. Many of the fatalities are vulnerable road users such as cyclists or pedestrians. Poor driver vision and lorry blind spots are a major cause of accidents. Unlike passenger cars, there are no direct vision requirements for lorries and regulators have instead focused on mirrors to reduce blind spots.

How clean are Europe’s cars 2014 – Part 1

The EU set legally-binding targets for new cars to emit on average 130 grams of CO₂ per kilometre (g/km) by 2015 and 95g/km by 2021. This briefing, the first part of T&E’s ‘How clean are Europe’s cars 2014’, analyses the official data from the European Environment Agency on progress towards these targets made by carmakers in 2013. The second and third part of the report will cover electric vehicles and supercredits as well as the gap between carmakers claimed fuel economy and the real world figure.

Studies on energy crops and wood for bioenergy

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Two new studies, commissioned by Transport & Environment, BirdLife Europe, and the European Environmental Bureau, aim to provide new evidence on the availability of sustainable biomass in the EU, with a focus on energy crops and forest biomass. Here we provide two briefings, as well as the complete studies, to download.

T&E's response to EU 2020 energy efficiency objective and 2030 energy efficiency policy framework consultation

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This completed questionnaire is T&E's response to the public consultation on the review of progress towards the EU's 2020 energy efficiency objective and a 2030 energy efficiency policy framework. T&E thinks that transport must not be left out of Europe's overall efforts to boost energy efficiency. There remain huge opportunities to improve energy efficiency in transport at EU level.

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