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Letter to Hedegaard cabinet on reform of the EU Effort Sharing Decision

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In December 2013 the European Commission is expected to publish more concrete proposals for the 2030 framework for climate and energy policies. Providing a legal framework for key sectors and gases currently covered by the Effort Sharing Decision (ESD) will be crucial to deliver significant emissions reductions up to 2030 required to keep the EU on a competitive low carbon pathway.

Open letter to the Lithuanian Presidency of the EU calling on the deal on CO2 emissions from cars to be put to a vote

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In this open letter to the Lithuanian Presidency of the Council of the EU, Transport & Environment and Greenpeace call on the Presidency to fulfil its role as neutral and unbiased chair, follow the wish of the vast majority of member states and the two other EU institutions, and put the agreed deal to reduce CO2 emissions from new cars to a vote.

Tar sands and the Fuel Quality Directive - what is it all about?

What it IS about: The Fuel Quality Directive (FQD) sets a 6% reduction target in the carbon intensity of transport fuels to be met by 2020. This is a technology-neutral target that leaves to the industry a range of options to meet it in the most cost-effective way. What it's NOT about: The Commission proposal to implement the FQD assigns carbon intensity to all fossil fuel feedstocks, namely: tar sands, coal-to-liquid, oil shale, gas-to-liquid and conventional oil. It does NOT discriminate between sources on the basis of geographical locations; it’s all about the carbon intensity of each fuel source.

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How clean are Europe's cars 2013

This report is the eighth T&E has published on the annual progress Europe’s major car manufacturers have made in reducing CO2 emissions and fuel consumption of new cars. As we did in previous reports, we also assess progress per EU Member State and review how official CO2 figures are translating into the ‘real world’.
 

Letter to Barroso on the implementation of the Fuel Quality Directive and unconventional fuels

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This letter by environmental groups to President Barroso underlines the urgent need to re-submit to the Environment Council a robust and science-based implementation of the Fuel Quality Directive (FQD) after the process of the impact assessment is concluded. Recent research has shown that this proposal would not only reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) in Europe, but also result in global GHG emissions reductions of 60 million tonnes.

Manipulation of fuel economy test results by carmakers: new evidence and solutions

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A growing body of evidence shows the current test used to measure car fuel efficiency is outdated, unrepresentative of real-world driving and lax enough to allow carmakers to systematically manipulate official test results at the expense of consumers’ trust. European institutions are presently finalising a regulation to lower CO2 emissions from cars and vans in 2020. This has stimulated intense debate when and how a new official test should be introduced. This briefing informs this debate in the light of new evidence from the International Council on Clean Transportation (ICCT) that for the first time compares progress in official and real-world vehicle fuel efficiency on a brand-by-brand basis.

Environmental and economic impacts of FQD implementation

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A new study by Carbon Matters and CE Delft shows that proper implementation of the Fuel Quality Directive (FQD) with different values assigned to different types of unconventional fossil fuels, such as tar sands and oil shale, can shift investments away from these ultra-high carbon energy sources towards lower carbon ones, leading to global greenhouse gas savings. As such, the study underpins the need for keeping such differentiated values in the legislative proposal by the European Commission, which is currently subject to an impact assessment.

Mind the Gap! Why official car fuel economy figures don’t match up to reality

This report provides new evidence and understanding on why there is a growing gap between the official fuel consumption and CO2 emissions of new passenger cars and vans, and that which is achieved by the same vehicles on the road. It demonstrates that the current (NEDC) test is outdated and unrepresentative of real-world driving and current vehicles, and that lax testing procedures are allowing car-makers to manipulate the official tests to produce unrealistically low results.The report also shows that the current supervision of testing and checks on production vehicles (to ensure these are equivalent to tested vehicles) are inconsistent and inadequate, with manufacturers paying the organisations undertaking and certifying the tests. The conclusion is that the current system for measuring car and van fuel economy and CO2 emissions is not fit for purpose and is in need to urgent updating.

Documento de posición: Vehículos de baja emisión de carbono: beneficios para los conductores, la economía y el medio ambiente

Los vehículos generan una octava parte de las emisiones de dióxido de carbono (CO2) de Europa. La cantidad de CO2 generada está directamente relacionada con la cantidad de consumo de combustible de los vehículos. Por lo tanto, los vehículos con una emisión de carbono inferior son más eficientes y económicos por lo que respecta al consumo de combustible.

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Vehículos de emisiones ultra bajas y supercréditos

En el año 2009, la Unión Europea estableció una serie de objetivos de obligado cumplimiento para reducir las emisiones de los vehículos nuevos a 130 gramos de CO2 por kilómetro (g/km) para 2015 y a 95 g/km en 2020.

En este documento se expone por qué y cómo se debe fomentar el mercado de vehículos hipocarbónicos sin reducir los considerables beneficios que se derivan del aumento de la eficiencia de los vehículos convencionales.

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