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Carmakers and fuel producers’ wishful thinking on transport’s climate challenge

A consortium of car makers, oil companies and biofuels producers (the Auto Fuel Coalition) have wrongly claimed existing policies are almost sufficient to tackle transport emissions. The coalition report produced by German consultancy Roland Berger examined the measures needed to achieve CO2 reductions in the transport sector by 2030. In this briefing T&E outlines how that study makes a number of grossly incorrect assumptions that lead to hugely exaggerated estimates of the effectiveness of current rules.

5 ideas to improve governance in the Effort Sharing Decision

The Effort Sharing Decision covers close to 60% of all greenhouse gas emissions in the EU. It is the EU’s carbon budget for the transport, building and agriculture sectors, among other smaller sectors. It is critical that the 2030 ESD delivers real-world GHG reductions of at least 30%. However, it is equally important to transform the current ESD into an instrument that is “Paris proof”. The review of the 2030 ESD provides a unique opportunity to lay the foundation of a climate governance regime that is robust enough to accommodate the increased ambition the Paris agreement requires. This briefing discusses five new ideas to improve ESD governance.

Decarbonising surface transport and the 2030 targets: What the European Commission should do

Early in summer 2016 the European Commission will present a proposal on the 2030 effort sharing decision (ESD) and a communication listing the key initiatives the EU will take to reduce road transport GHG emissions through EU measures. EU Transport and Environment Ministers are meeting in Amsterdam on 14 and 15 April to discuss smart and green transport and provide input for the Commission’s plans. This briefing summarises Transport & Environment’s key recommendations on surface transport for ministers ahead of this Informal Council meeting.

Natural gas in vehicles – on the road to nowhere

In February 2016, the European Commission released a proposal to guarantee its gas supply security and is preparing another one to implement the EU’s 2030 climate targets for the transport, buildings and agriculture sectors. It is also developing a communication to decarbonise the road transport sector, to be announced this summer. To understand what role natural gas could have in achieving these objectives, T&E commissioned a study from Ricardo Energy & Environment to assess the impacts of large-scale use of natural gas in the transport sector.

How the European car industry plans to meet the climate challenge

In this briefing T&E looks at a new study that highlights the key role CO2 standards for cars, vans and trucks in 2025 and 2030 will play in meeting climate goals for 2030. T&E also analyses a report by the European Automobile Manufacturers’ Association (ACEA) which again looked at ways to reduce road transport's greenhouse gas emissions.

Our statement to the Gear 2030

"The EU must not allow our current specialism in diesel to lock-in the EU to this solution” Greg Archer said at the kick-off meeting of GEAR 2030 that took place on 26 March. GEAR 2030 is a high-level group set up by the Commission to foster the competitiveness of the European car industry. The Commission has proposed three working groups: one on the future of supply chains, one on connected vehicles and one on trade. "What’s missing? A working group on electric cars", Greg concluded.

Letter to EU's Technical Committee on Motor Vehicles on finalising new Real-world Driving Emissions test

In this letter to the EU's Technical Committee on Motor Vehicles, T&E highlights the urgent need to finalise the new Real-world Driving Emissions (RDE) test as soon as possible to reduce emissions on the road and tackle the illegal use of defeat devices.

Mind the Gap 2015: Closing the chasm between test and real-world car CO2 emissions

The system of testing cars to measure fuel economy and CO2 emissions is utterly discredited. This report analyses the gap between test results and real-world performance and finds that it has become a chasm, increasing from 8% in 2001 to 31% in 2012 and 40% in 2014. Without action this gap will grow to nearly 50% by 2020. It also looks at which models have been found to have the biggest gap between claimed CO2 emissions and real-world performance.

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