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Dieselgate: Who? What? How?

This report, released on the first anniversary of the Dieselgate scandal, exposes the shocking number of dirty diesel cars on the EU’s roads and the feeble regulation of cars by national authorities that have focused on protecting their own commercial interests or those of domestic carmakers. In the US, following the disclosure that VW had cheated emissions tests, justice has been swiftly and effectively delivered. This is in stark contrast to Europe where VW claims it has not acted illegally, no penalties have been levied and no compensation has been provided to customers.

Published on September 19, 2016 - 00:02

Recipe for Spain: How to start decarbonising Spanish transport

This summer, the European Commission will present new targets for member states’ Effort Sharing Decision sectors for the period 2021 to 2030 and publish a communication on decarbonising transport. The ESD sets an overall EU climate target of -30% by 2030 below 2005 levels for sectors not included under the EU emissions trading system (non-ETS emissions) – mainly surface transport, buildings and agriculture. The ESD requires member states to limit their GHG emissions by meeting individual binding annual limits. This ‘recipe for Spain’ serves as a guideline on how to reduce emissions from transport and secure the climate target.

Published on June 15, 2016 - 11:31

Recipe for Germany: How to start decarbonising German transport

This summer, the European Commission will present new targets for member states’ Effort Sharing Decision sectors for the period 2021 to 2030 and publish a communication on decarbonising transport. Germany’s anticipated 2030 reduction target for all sectors covered by the ESD will be -39%. Thus, Germany will have to decrease its transport emissions to 97 MtCO2 eq by 2030. This ‘recipe for Germany’ serves as a guideline on how to reduce emissions from transport and secure the climate target.

Published on June 8, 2016 - 13:22

The ‘Dirty 30’ highly polluting diesel cars in Europe and the national regulators failing to act

Transport & Environment has re-analysed the data from the national emissions testing programmes and identified 30 of among the highest polluting new diesel cars on Europe’s roads. The “Dirty Thirty” span across most carmakers with Renault (four), Mercedes (three) and Opel/Vauxhall (three) standing out. Each car was approved by one of seven national type approval authorities. Nine cars were approved in the UK; Germany and France each approved seven; the Netherlands approved three; Luxembourg two; and Spain and Italy one each.

Published on June 6, 2016 - 09:33

Type approval reform: a once-in-a-decade opportunity to improve Europe’s failing testing system

This briefing explains how the new type approval proposal is a once-in-a-decade opportunity to strengthen the European vehicle and component testing system, and that while the proposal is a good start, it is missing key elements needed to make it truly effective.

Published on May 23, 2016 - 15:12

Gas in road transport: (still) a dead-end

Earlier this year the European Commission published a communication on the security of the EU natural gas supply. The Commission is also preparing a decarbonisation of transport communication and action plan. In this context, T&E commissioned Ricardo Energy & Environment to perform a study that analyses the climate and economic impacts of a switch from oil-based fuels (for example petrol, diesel, HFO) to natural and bio-gas-based products (LNG, CNG, bio-methane). 

Published on May 17, 2016 - 15:28

Recommendations for Belgium climate commission

On 11 April, 2016, T&E's freight and climate director William Todts spoke at the hearing on a sustainable Flemish mobility policy within the framework of the EU 2030 objectives. His recommendations focus on the following elements: Cleaner Vehicles; cleaner Fuels; and better traffic management and smarter taxation. Download the recommendations in full below.

Published on May 9, 2016 - 14:17

Carmakers and fuel producers’ wishful thinking on transport’s climate challenge

A consortium of car makers, oil companies and biofuels producers (the Auto Fuel Coalition) have wrongly claimed existing policies are almost sufficient to tackle transport emissions. The coalition report produced by German consultancy Roland Berger examined the measures needed to achieve CO2 reductions in the transport sector by 2030. In this briefing T&E outlines how that study makes a number of grossly incorrect assumptions that lead to hugely exaggerated estimates of the effectiveness of current rules.

Published on April 28, 2016 - 15:31

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