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Appraisal of the Ulmer Report on cars & CO2

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In July 2012 the Commission published its proposal to review Regulation 443/2009 which sets CO2 emission targets for new passenger cars. The Environment Committee leads the deliberations in the European Parliament and Thomas Ulmer (EPP) has been appointed rapporteur. This briefing appraises proposals within his report and quantifies how these could lead to a weakening of the target in excess of 10g, raising the target to more than 105g/km.

Appraisal of the Krahmer Report on vans & CO2

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In July 2012 the Commission published its proposal to review Regulation 510/2011 which sets CO2 emission targets for new light commercial vehicles (vans). The Environment Committee leads the deliberations in the European Parliament and Holger Krahmer (ALDE) has been appointed rapporteur. This briefing appraises proposals within his report and quantifies how these could lead to a weakening of the target in excess of 10g, raising the target to more than 157g/km.

The right utility parameter – mass or footprint (or both)?

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In 2009, the EU set legally-binding targets for new cars to emit 130 grams of CO2 per kilometer (g/km) by 2015 and 95g/km in 2020.  In July, the Commission announced the outcome of its review of the modalities (ways) of achieving the 2020 target. The regulation takes account of the “utility” or purpose of the cars produced by different manufacturers whose targets therefore vary. In 2009, the EU agreed to account for the utility of the vehicles and set targets for individual manufacturers by comparing the average weight (mass) of the cars they produce. This was largely because data was not available on the average size (footprint) of registered cars until 2011. The Commission’s new proposal is to continue to use mass as a measure of utility until 2020 in order to minimize changes to the regulation. 

Stop the Clock: the ETS Aviation Derogation

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The European Commission has proposed a one year “stop the clock” derogation for the aviation portion of the EU Emissions Trading System (ETS) Directive to provide ‘breathing space’ for the International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) to come to a global agreement on regulating international aviation emissions. The derogation applies to all flights to and from Europe (including EFTA states and Croatia) except intra-European flights.T&E regrets that the Commission has been put in this difficult position through international pressure, particularly from the US.

Véhicules à très faibles émissions de carbone et super crédits

En 2009, l'UE a instauré des normes contraignantes pour la performance des véhicules particuliers neufs: 130 grammes de dioxyde de carbone (CO2) par kilomètre (g/km) d'ici à 2015 et 95 g/km d'ici à 2020. La proposition récente de la Commission établit les modalités de la réalisation de l’objectif de 2020. Cette proposition de règlementation a confirmé l’objectif de 95 g/km mais a réintroduit les super crédits (récompenses pour les ventes de véhicules à très faibles émissions de carbone), qui affaiblissent l'objectif.

Ce document souligne pourquoi et comment le marché des voitures à très faibles émissions de carbone devrait être soutenu sans qu'il faille pour autant sacrifier la recherche sur l'amélioration des voitures conventionnelles.

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Les véhicules à faibles émissions de carbone : bons pour l'emploi en Europe

Le présent document et l’étude sur laquelle il se fonde apportent des éléments clés quant à l’impact sur l'emploi des véhicules à faibles émissions de carbone. Ils sont l'aboutissement d'une vaste revue de la littérature consacrée à la question réalisée par CE Delft.

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