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Ultralow carbon vehicles and supercredits

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In 2009, the EU set legally-binding targets for new cars to emit 130 grams of carbon dioxide (CO2) per kilometer (g/km) by 2015 and 95g/km in 2020.1 The Commission recently proposed a review of the way the 2020 target should be met.2 This confirmed the 95g/km value but reintroduced supercredits (additional rewards for sales of ultralow carbon vehicles) that weaken the target. This paper outlines why and how the market for ultralow carbon cars should be supported without reducing the wider benefits of improving the efficiency of conventional cars.

Published on November 12, 2012 - 12:22

POSITION PAPER: Low carbon cars – good for drivers, good for economy, good for the environment

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Cars are responsible for approaching a fifth of Europe’s carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. The amount of CO2 produced is directly related to the amount of fuel the vehicle consumes – lower carbon vehicles are therefore more fuel efficient and cheaper to run. Lower fuel costs for drivers boost consumer spending in other areas creating jobs.

Published on October 11, 2012 - 10:53

Cars and CO2

This briefing covers the EU's draft proposal on cutting co2 emissions to 95g CO2 / km by 2020.  It gives an overview of the benefits of regulating new car fuel efficiency and co2 emissions and examines whether past claims made by the automotive industry about the impact of such legislation actually came true.

Published on June 7, 2012 - 10:36

TEN-T Guidelines and Connecting Europe Facility: Recommendations for sustainable transport spending

This briefing from BirdLife Europe, CEE Bankwatch, Friends of the Earth Europe, T&E and WWF explains how EU transport spending under the Trans-European Transport Networks (TEN-T) and Connecting Europe Facility (CEF) programmes could be made more effective, economically viable and sustainable.A full-length version of this analysis is also available.

Published on June 6, 2012 - 15:40

Biofuels: dealing with indirect land use change (ILUC)

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Two EU laws adopted in 2009 promote the use of biofuels in the EU, ostensibly for the purpose of reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the transport sector.  However, both the Renewable Energy Directive (RED) and Fuel Quality Directive (FQD) could lead to higher, not lower greenhouse gas emissions unless the issue of Indirect Land Use Change (ILUC)

Published on May 7, 2012 - 14:49

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