Browse by topic: Pricing and taxation, Transport policy

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Will Ireland be next to close the diesel-petrol tax gap?

Ireland has moved a step closer to becoming the latest European nation to equalise taxation on petrol and diesel. A paper from an interdepartmental committee of the Irish government has proposed a way to wipe out the 22% tax advantage diesel currently enjoys over petrol. The paper justifies the move on air quality and climate change grounds.
Published on August 10, 2016 - 10:05

Transport is now Europe’s biggest climate problem - EEA data

Greenhouse gas emissions from the transport sector have grown for the first time since 2007 while those of other sectors of the economy have decreased, data released today by the European Environment Agency (EEA) revealed. The EEA’s report on EU-wide trends in greenhouse gas emissions in 2014 plainly shows that transport has now become the single biggest emitter of greenhouse gases in Europe.

Published on June 21, 2016 - 13:39

Natural gas vehicles an expensive, ineffective way to cut car and truck emissions – not a ‘bridge fuel’

Increasing the use of natural gas in cars and trucks would be largely ineffective in reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and air pollution, a new independent study finds. There are no GHG savings in shifting from diesel cars and trucks to compressed or liquefied natural gas (LNG) cars and trucks, while petrol-hybrid, electric and hydrogen cars deliver much greater climate benefits, the study for sustainable transport group Transport & Environment says.

Published on March 1, 2016 - 18:24

Vehicle fuel efficiency standards can help EU countries halve their climate obligations from transport – study

Europe can only meet the climate targets Heads of State agreed on for sectors outside the Emissions Trading System (ETS) if it sets fuel efficiency standards for new cars, vans and lorries by 2025 or earlier, a new study by Transport & Environment (T&E) reveals [1]. In a middle-of-the-road scenario where transport would cut CO2 emissions by 30% by 2030 [2], the study found that CO2 standards for all vehicles (cars, vans and lorries) in 2025 and 2030 would deliver a whopping 42% of the emissions reduction required from transport. 

Published on June 10, 2015 - 09:39

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