Browse by topic: Press release, Lorries, Standards

Filters:

Transport industry and green groups join forces to inject competition into truck fuel efficiency

The International Road Union, The European Express Association, Leaseurope, CLECAT, Green Freight Europe, The Northern Logistics Association, European Transport Board and Transport & Environment call on the European Commission to give a much-needed boost to competition on truck fuel efficiency, in a letter sent today to Commission officials.

US unveils new lorry fuel economy target; EU left for dust – again

Today's announcement by US authorities of a target to improve lorry fuel efficiency by 24% by 2027, on top of limits announced in 2011, is a wake-up call to the EU which has failed to regulate heavy-duty vehicles' CO2 emissions. Europe currently only plans to introduce a monitoring scheme.

Vehicle fuel efficiency standards can help EU countries halve their climate obligations from transport – study

Europe can only meet the climate targets Heads of State agreed on for sectors outside the Emissions Trading System (ETS) if it sets fuel efficiency standards for new cars, vans and lorries by 2025 or earlier, a new study by Transport & Environment (T&E) reveals [1]. In a middle-of-the-road scenario where transport would cut CO2 emissions by 30% by 2030 [2], the study found that CO2 standards for all vehicles (cars, vans and lorries) in 2025 and 2030 would deliver a whopping 42% of the emissions reduction required from transport. 

Parliament says yes to safer, more efficient lorries

The European Parliament today voted to end brick-shaped lorries, clearing the way for advances in fuel efficiency and safety for drivers, cyclists and pedestrians. The new law allows lorrymakers to produce new designs but industry lobbyists secured a ban until 2022 even though the new designs are voluntary, not mandatory. The Commission will propose new safety requirements for trucks by amending its vehicle safety regulations by 2016.

T&E welcomes common rules to enable smarter road tolls in Europe

Earlier this week, Violeta Bulc, the EU’s head of transport, announced plans to develop a Europe-wide scheme to charge lorries and cars for using roads. Bulc clarified that the scheme would be optional, meaning that countries like the UK could opt out if they want to. The Transport Commissioner also stressed that the amount of the fee should be based exclusively on the distance driven and should not be time-dependent, which would bolster more efficient use of roads.

EU governments agree cleaner, safer lorries – but Commission must drive improvements

Representatives of EU governments today accepted a deal with the European Parliament to end brick-shaped lorries, clearing the way for advances in fuel efficiency and safety for drivers, cyclists and pedestrians. The agreed law allows lorrymakers to produce new designs but industry lobbyists secured a ban until 2022 even though the new designs are voluntary, not mandatory [1]. The Commission will propose new safety requirements for trucks by amending its vehicle safety regulations by 2016.

Putting transport in the ETS will hinder job growth, stall emissions cuts – study

Even if carbon prices in Europe’s emissions trading system (ETS) trebled from today’s levels [1], including road transport in the ETS would only reduce oil use and CO2 emissions from transport by 3% over the next 15 years, a new study by Cambridge Econometrics reveals. This level is insufficient for road transport to make a proportionate contribution to Europe’s climate and energy security goals.

'Climate and energy portfolio needs Commissioner unencumbered by conflicts of interest' – T&E reaction to Cañete hearing

Transport & Environment's reaction to the Parliament hearing for Commissioner-designate for Climate Action and Energy, Miguel Arias Cañete.

Despite three-hours of grilling by MEPs of the Commissioner-designate for Climate Action and Energy, Miguel Arias Cañete failed to explain how there is no conflict of interest with his brother-in-law Miguel Domecq Solís being a director of two oil companies.

Direct-vision lorries to save hundreds of lives – study

An 80cm longer cab with a rounded nose, smaller dashboard, expanded glazed areas and a slightly lower driver position could drastically reduce fatal blind spots [1] around the lorry cab, a new study by the Loughborough Design School [2] reveals. The ‘Direct Vision’ lorry concept would increase the driver’s field of view in front and to the sides of the lorry by 50% compared to today’s lorry designs and could save hundreds of cyclists’ and pedestrians’ lives. 

Pages