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T&E responses to consultation on an EU strategy for LNG and gas storage

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In July 2015 the European Commission opened a public consulation on an EU strategy for liquefied natural gas and gas storage. In its response T&E state that natural gas cannot deliver the decarbonisation that the sector needs to achieve the EU climate goals up to 2050. Investing in this technology would divert necessary resources from truly low-carbon alternatives in the transport sector and would create lock-in effects. Public resources for energy transition in transport should go where it offers the greatest public benefits, improved efficiency, and sustainable electrification.

Submission on a CO2 standard for new aircraft

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An efficiency standard is a key element of ICAO’s basket of measures and is intended to deliver emissions reductions beyond business-as-usual. But on current indications the ICAO standard for new aircraft types will not affect any new aircraft types and will only cover 5% of the world fleet in 2030. In this submission T&E outlines its position that the EPA should ensure that any standard adopted ensures efficiency improvements that go beyond business-as-usual.

Some Mercedes, BMW and Peugeot models consuming around 50% more fuel than official results, new study reveals

New cars, including the Mercedes A, C and E class, BMW 5 series and Peugeot 308, are now swallowing around 50% more fuel than their lab test results, new on-the-road results compiled by Transport & Environment (T&E) reveal. The gap between official and real-world performance found in many car models has grown so wide that it cannot be explained through known factors including test manipulations. While this does not constitute proof of ‘defeat devices’ being used to fiddle fuel economy tests, similar to that used by Volkswagen, EU governments must extend probes into defeat devices to CO2 tests and petrol cars too.

Mind the Gap 2015: Closing the chasm between test and real-world car CO2 emissions

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The system of testing cars to measure fuel economy and CO2 emissions is utterly discredited. This report analyses the gap between test results and real-world performance and finds that it has become a chasm, increasing from 8% in 2001 to 31% in 2012 and 40% in 2014. Without action this gap will grow to nearly 50% by 2020. It also looks at which models have been found to have the biggest gap between claimed CO2 emissions and real-world performance.

The VW scandal and what does it mean for TTIP?

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Unless you have buried your head in the sand over the last couple of days, you would have been hard pressed to miss the VW cheating scandal that has erupted in the United States. A tsunami of media stories have taken over the front pages of the FT, NYT, The Guardian, Le Figaro, Il Sole 24 Ore, to name a few.

Fuel consumption meters, saving motorists up to €50 a year, get MEPs’ backing

Eco-driving technology that will save motorists €30 to €50 year today received the backing of MEPs who called for mandatory fuel consumption meters for all new cars, vans and trucks. The European Parliament’s environment committee overwhelmingly voted for the meters to be fitted and permanently visible in all new vehicles from 1 January 2019, leading to fuel efficiency gains of 2-3% per year.

Four countries back truck CO2 limits, as lorries rival cars in share of emissions

Four EU countries have called for mandatory fuel economy standards for trucks, documents reveal – as new research by sustainable transport group Transport & Environment (T&E) projects heavy-duty vehicles (HDVs) will almost overtake cars as the biggest source of road transport emissions by 2030. CO2 emissions are directly related to the fuel economy of internal-combustion vehicles, with more fuel-efficient vehicles emitting less greenhouse gas.

Too big to ignore – truck CO2 emissions in 2030

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Emissions from heavy-duty vehicles (HDV), which include trucks and buses, increased by 36% between 1990 and 2010 and continue to grow. HDV emissions currently represent around 30% of all road transport CO2 emissions and 5% of all EU CO2 emissions. This briefing by T&E analyses existing data and finds that unless additional measures are taken HDV emissions will increase to 40% of road transport emissions by 2030.