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Analysis of estimated index values of ships that have entered the fleet since 2009

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There is little publicly available information on how the design efficiency of ships that have entered the fleet since 2009 has developed. The IMO has published the energy efficiency design index (EEDI) of a limited number of ships launched since 2012, but the sample of ships is small and the time period limited. The published data show clearly, however, that estimated index values (EIV) and EEDIs of ships are well correlated.

Study shows new ships already meeting 2020 design efficiency standard

A new CE Delft study has revealed that many recently constructed ships already meet the International Maritime Organisation’s design efficiency standard for 2020, indicating that there is significant room for tightening these standards when the IMO meets next week.

Rail tunnel financing saves congestion charge in Gothenburg

The city council in Gothenburg has decided to keep the city’s congestion charge despite the result of a referendum held last September that called for its abolition. The decision to maintain the charge was taken in order to protect funding for a new rail tunnel under the city centre.

Ship emissions reporting ‘must be stepping stone to CO2 target’

Shipping users will for the first time be granted access to transparent data that identifies the most efficient ships and practices, under a law approved by the European Parliament in full today. The public disclosure of fuel efficiency data will enhance competition for the best ships and routes, which in turn will trigger market forces that will result in fuel savings. Sustainable transport group Transport & Environment (T&E) said the measure is a stepping stone to CO2 targets that will start delivering much-needed cuts to shipping’s ever-growing emissions.

EU agrees to stop bad biofuels after 2020

The full European Parliament today agreed to cap the use of land-based biofuels in transport, with the aim of being a check on the growing consumption of biofuels that increase carbon emissions compared to conventional diesel and petrol. Today’s vote marks the endgame for the EU’s public policy support for biofuels, after more than a decade. 

Shipping emissions – the final EU climate frontier

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On 28 April 2015, the European Parliament was expected to ratify a Monitoring, Reporting and Verification (MRV) regulation for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shipping. This briefing details how shipping emissions have increased by approximately 70% since 1990 and the EU's track record on cutting these emissions. Under current policies, the IMO's GHG study forecasts shipping CO2 emissions to increase by 50% to 250% by 2050, which would then represent between 6% to 14% of total global emissions. While emissions from other sectors have started declining or are looking to peak in 2020, none of the “business as usual” scenarios for shipping foresee a decline in shipping emissions before 2050. The EU has promised measures for shipping emissions three times since 2009 and the Commission’s communication on Energy Union made it clear that all sources of emissions should contribute to the EU 2030 reduction target.

EU biofuels reform – endgame for bad biofuels

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On 28 April 2015, the European Parliament was expected to adopt a final compromise for the reform of EU biofuels policy that would then be endorsed by the Council of the EU. This briefing outlines how, after several years of difficult discussions, this compromise lacks the necessary ambition to tackle properly the issue of indirect land-use change (ILUC). However, it sets some key principles for the phase-out of first-generation biofuels, recognises the problem of ILUC emissions and introduces new measures for other alternatives such as advanced biofuels and renewable electricity. T&E stresses that these elements will need to be captured in the 2030 transport fuels policies.

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