Browse by topic: Climate Change and Energy, Vans

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A critical assessment of the Aachen study on the CO2 reduction potential for light commercial vehicles

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In 2010 the EU reached an agreement on CO2 emission standards for light commercial vehicles (vans). The final outcome was a significant weakening of the initial Commission proposal of 135g CO2/km. Misinformation about technological potential and inflated cost estimates convinced policy makers that the proposed target levels had to be weakened. A study which was instrumental in influencing policy makers was the 2010 Aachen (IKA) study. It had been commissioned by the German ministry of economy to inform its position and concluded that CO2 emission reductions from vans are extremely difficult and very expensive. Despite the availability of new and more up-to-date studies, today the same study continues to be used to assert that 147g is an “over-ambitious” target.This briefing analyses how the IKA study came to its results and assesses the credibility of these results. 

Road transport in the EU ETS – why it is a bad idea

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This paper is a response from Transport & Environment to the ‘Consultation on structural options to strengthen the EU Emissions Trading System’ (ETS) by the European Commission. The response focuses on the fourth (‘d’) of six options proposed – extension of the scope of the ETS to other sectors - with a special focus on extending the scope of the ETS to road transport. T&E strongly opposes this idea, as it will not deliver economic benefits and will seriously jeopardise emissions reductions in transport. 

Appraisal of the Krahmer Report on vans & CO2

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In July 2012 the Commission published its proposal to review Regulation 510/2011 which sets CO2 emission targets for new light commercial vehicles (vans). The Environment Committee leads the deliberations in the European Parliament and Holger Krahmer (ALDE) has been appointed rapporteur. This briefing appraises proposals within his report and quantifies how these could lead to a weakening of the target in excess of 10g, raising the target to more than 157g/km.

The case for 2025 targets for CO2 emissions from cars and vans - Report

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The EU has set a legally-binding target for new cars to emit no more than 95 grammes of CO2 per kilometre (g/km) by 2020. The target for vans is 147g/km. In July 2012, the European Commission announced its proposals on how these targets should be met. These proposals are currently being considered by the European Parliament and Council. The Commission did not propose further standards for 2025.This briefing outlines the arguments for setting strong 2025 targets and explains why industry arguments for delaying these targets are unfounded and would set back progress. It is based on new research by consultancy Ricardo-AEA (also downloadable in this page) as well as other evidence.

At least a third of official car CO2 reductions are not real

A new report for the Commission suggests about a third of reported carbon dioxide emissions reductions from new cars since 2002 have not happened. T&E says this results in drivers being ‘cheated’ out of the benefits of lower fuel costs, as well as higher emissions of greenhouse gases.

It’s the fuel economy, stupid!

When? 
Wednesday, January 23, 2013 - 07:30 to 09:30
Where? 
European Parliament A5E1
1047 Brussels
Belgium

The business case for stricter CO2 and fuel efficiency standards for vansWhat?Breakfast debate, hosted by MEP Schlyter, on the business benefits of tightening the van fuel efficiency and CO2 standards set by Regulation 510/2011.This event is co-organised by T&E.  For questions, please contact William Todts.

Emissions de CO2 des VUL – Vers des objectifs plus ambitieux

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Le carburant est un poste de coûts de plus en plus important pour les entreprises. L’utilisation d’une camionnette (ou VUL pour véhicule utilitaire léger) génère en moyenne une facture annuelle de diesel de l’ordre de 2.400 euros1 – soit environ un tiers du « total cost of ownership » (TCO).

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European carmakers ‘overtake’ most Asian competitors in green race, T&E report shows

European car manufacturers are better positioned than most of their Asian counterparts [1] to meet the target of 95 g/km average CO2 emissions by 2020, T&E’s 2012 Cars Report says. In the race to hit the 2020 95g target, all European makers (except Daimler) rank in the top 9 whilst five of the bottom six carmakers are Asian.

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