Browse by topic: Climate Change and Energy, Environmental policy, Shipping

Filters:

Environment Committee calls for monitoring, reporting and verification of both NOx and CO2

The European Parliament’s Environment Committee voted overwhelmingly today to support and strengthen some elements of the Commission’s proposal for monitoring, reporting and verification (MRV) of shipping emissions. Transport & Environment welcomes the inclusion of the air pollutant NOx in the monitoring measure. However, MEPs rejected the chance to use ship efficiency as an accurate measure of emissions, which is the key to improving the sector’s environmental performance.

Report suggests win-win opportunity for ship owners and the environment

The most effective way to reduce carbon emissions from shipping is also the most economic. That is the message from a new study commissioned by T&E and Seas at Risk (SAR) that looks at monitoring and reducing maritime emissions. It says ship operators could save €5-9 million a year if they invested in 21st-century technology.

Ship owners could save up to €9m a year with advanced emissions monitoring – study

Advanced emissions monitoring of large ships calling at EU ports could help save owners and operators of large ships up to €9 million/year, according to a new study published by environmental NGOs Transport & Environment and Seas at Risk. These savings would come from lower operational costs of using automated systems such as fuel flow meters or continuous emissions monitoring, which are already used by many of the world’s largest shipping companies.

Shipping: the final EU climate frontier

This comment by Aoife O'Leary was first published by the European Voice. During the annual United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change summit, it is worth remembering that there is one huge industry that has so far managed to evade any formalised efforts at emissions reductions. Every industry and transport sector in the European Union has greenhouse-gas emissions reduction measures in place, except for the shipping sector. The EU has established goals on the emissions reductions it wants to achieve from the sector, but seems to have no intention of enacting anything that will bring it anywhere near those goals, anytime soon.

Letter to Russia's Permanent Representative to the EU following detention of the Arctic 30

Sketch of a book (default image for publications

In this letter to Russia's Permanent Representative to the European Union, Transport & Environment expresses its opposition to the expansion of oil drilling activity in the Arctic and the resulting increase in shipping. T&E also calls for the immediate release of 28 Greenpeace activists and two journalists being detained in Russia following a protest against Arctic drilling.

Shipping emissions in the context of a 2°C emissions pathway

Sketch of a book (default image for publications

Shipping and aviation represented around 3.2 and 2.1 per cent respectively of global CO2 emissions in the mid-2000s. A wide range of projections and scenarios shows that both sectors are likely to grow over the coming decades with a resultant increase in CO2 emissions by 2050, despite various mitigation efforts. 

Monitoring of bunker fuel consumption

Sketch of a book (default image for publications

Monitoring of fuel consumption and GHG emissions from international shipping is currently under discussion at the EU level as well as at the IMO. There are several approaches to monitoring, each with different characteristics. Important differences exist with regards to the costs of the equipment, operational costs, the accuracy of the measurements, and the potential to monitor emissions of gases other than CO2. Moreover, some approaches offer more opportunities to improve the operational fuel-efficiency of ships and fit better to possible future policies than others.The following report discusses these approaches.

Pages