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Study of historical trends in ship design efficiency 2016

The International Maritime Organisation (IMO) is currently engaged in a review of the 2020 target of its ship design efficiency standard (known as the EEDI). One of the main questions being addressed is whether the stringency of the regulation should be retained or amended. Another issue is the effectiveness of existing EEDI targets in driving design efficiency improvements.

Natural gas in vehicles – on the road to nowhere

In February 2016, the European Commission released a proposal to guarantee its gas supply security and is preparing another one to implement the EU’s 2030 climate targets for the transport, buildings and agriculture sectors. It is also developing a communication to decarbonise the road transport sector, to be announced this summer. To understand what role natural gas could have in achieving these objectives, T&E commissioned a study from Ricardo Energy & Environment to assess the impacts of large-scale use of natural gas in the transport sector.

Analysis of estimated index values of ships that have entered the fleet since 2009

There is little publicly available information on how the design efficiency of ships that have entered the fleet since 2009 has developed. The IMO has published the energy efficiency design index (EEDI) of a limited number of ships launched since 2012, but the sample of ships is small and the time period limited. The published data show clearly, however, that estimated index values (EIV) and EEDIs of ships are well correlated.

Monitoring of bunker fuel consumption

Monitoring of fuel consumption and GHG emissions from international shipping is currently under discussion at the EU level as well as at the IMO. There are several approaches to monitoring, each with different characteristics. Important differences exist with regards to the costs of the equipment, operational costs, the accuracy of the measurements, and the potential to monitor emissions of gases other than CO2. Moreover, some approaches offer more opportunities to improve the operational fuel-efficiency of ships and fit better to possible future policies than others.The following report discusses these approaches.

Regulated Slow Steaming in Maritime Transport: An Assessment of Options, Costs and Benefits

This report studies the impacts of vessel speed on emissions, technical constraints and other experiences with regard to slow steaming and current speed regulations. Moreover, it analyses the legal feasibility of speed limits and feasibility of implementation, possible policy designs and the associated social costs and benefits of speed limits.