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Commission bends to car industry pressure

EC plan for a 2020 competitive car and lorry industry omits key environmental promises.The Commission’s Cars 2020 Action Plan (1) for a competitive and sustainable automotive industry in Europe announced today fails to address key strategic challenges such as climate change. Sustainable transport campaigners, Transport & Environment (T&E), have identified important omissions from the plans. This follows earlier announcements this week that other key policies to reduce the environmental impact of vehicles are being shelved.

Tyre label has vital lessons for fuel efficiency in road and air transport

Opinion by Nina Renshaw - T&E deputy director There aren’t many downsides to working at T&E, but if I have to name one, it is that we don’t often have the joy of seeing the fruits of our work in the real world. Mostly you don’t see less energy use or fewer emissions, and you see even fewer economic incentives at work when walking around town. So 1 November will be a rare moment.

Low-carbon cars can boost Europe’s economy

The idea that making cars cleaner would be bad for jobs and competitiveness is a myth. That is the conclusion from a report launched by T&E that looks into the economic consequences for carmakers to meet strict carbon dioxide emissions limits from 2020 and beyond. T&E says it strengthens the argument for an 80g/km target for 2020 and a 60g target for 2025.

Low carbon cars create new jobs in Europe, report says

Fuel efficient vehicles are good for EU employment, drivers, economy and the planet. Over 100,000 new manufacturing jobs could be created in Europe by investing in the development and manufacturing of fuel efficient technologies to make cars greener, a new report published today (1) by Transport & Environment (T&E), the sustainable transport campaigners, says. The report, conducted by the Dutch consultancy CE Delft, dispels industry’s claims that reducing CO2 emissions from cars would have a negative impact on automotive jobs and competitiveness in Europe. It also highlights that money saved through using less fuel increases consumers’ disposable income, which in turn creates extra jobs across the EU economy.

Low Carbon Vehicles: Good for EU Employment

This briefing paper, and the supporting report upon which it is based, fill the evidence gap about the employment effects of lower carbon vehicles. They summarise a review of published literature undertaken by CE Delft.

Also available in the following languages:

CE Delft literature review on employment impacts of GHG reduction policies for transport

Sketch of a book (default image for publications

Recently a large number of studies have been published that claim that accelerated uptake of electrical vehicles (EVs) and fuel efficient cars in the market for automotive transport may have positive employment benefits.

POSITION PAPER: Low carbon cars – good for drivers, good for economy, good for the environment

Cars are responsible for approaching a fifth of Europe’s carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. The amount of CO2 produced is directly related to the amount of fuel the vehicle consumes – lower carbon vehicles are therefore more fuel efficient and cheaper to run. Lower fuel costs for drivers boost consumer spending in other areas creating jobs.

Also available in the following languages:

Stricter CO2 standards needed or Europe won’t be able to compete

The Obama administration has finalised new rules to improve fuel economy for American car makers. They are expected to transform US cars and light trucks and lead to the widespread adoption of hybrid vehicles by 2025. The move threatens to leave Europe’s car industry at a competitive disadvantage unless stricter CO2 emissions targets are agreed for 2020 and beyond.

Tougher CO2 Targets for Cars: Emission Impossible?

In this blog post, T&E programme manager Greg Archer describes the policy and political consequences of the newly-released Commission's proposal on car CO2 emissions. He also tries to figure out the future scenarios that the proposal will be confronted with, once discussed by the parliament and the Council. The phrase "Emissions impossible", mentioned in the title was originally coined by Italian MEP Guido Sacconi.

Commission confirms car and van emissions limits for 2020

The European Commission has published proposals that will confirm carbon dioxide limits for new cars and vans for the year 2020 in a review of existing laws. The proposed legislation, released on 11 July, indicates that the average new car should emit no more than 95 grams of CO2 per kilometre, and the average new van 147 g/km by 2020. T&E has welcomed the proposals but says a lot more could have been achieved if the Commission had shown more ambition, for example by setting a target of 80g for 2020 and 60g for 2025.

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