Browse by topic: Briefing, Climate Change and Energy, Standards

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Carmakers and fuel producers’ wishful thinking on transport’s climate challenge

A consortium of car makers, oil companies and biofuels producers (the Auto Fuel Coalition) have wrongly claimed existing policies are almost sufficient to tackle transport emissions. The coalition report produced by German consultancy Roland Berger examined the measures needed to achieve CO2 reductions in the transport sector by 2030. In this briefing T&E outlines how that study makes a number of grossly incorrect assumptions that lead to hugely exaggerated estimates of the effectiveness of current rules.

Decarbonising surface transport and the 2030 targets: What the European Commission should do

Early in summer 2016 the European Commission will present a proposal on the 2030 effort sharing decision (ESD) and a communication listing the key initiatives the EU will take to reduce road transport GHG emissions through EU measures. EU Transport and Environment Ministers are meeting in Amsterdam on 14 and 15 April to discuss smart and green transport and provide input for the Commission’s plans. This briefing summarises Transport & Environment’s key recommendations on surface transport for ministers ahead of this Informal Council meeting.

How the European car industry plans to meet the climate challenge

In this briefing T&E looks at a new study that highlights the key role CO2 standards for cars, vans and trucks in 2025 and 2030 will play in meeting climate goals for 2030. T&E also analyses a report by the European Automobile Manufacturers’ Association (ACEA) which again looked at ways to reduce road transport's greenhouse gas emissions.

Briefing: ‘Trade for All’ – Balancing environmental protection and trade promotion

EU Trade Commissioner Cecilia Malmström released her five-year ‘Trade for All’ strategy in October 2015, which acknowledges growing public concern over the EU’s trade policies. We identify five areas that need revision in order to more equitably distribute the benefits and costs of the EU’s trade policy: global value chains; energy imports; sustainable development; investment protection; transparency.

Europe’s lost decade of truck fuel economy

Emissions from heavy-duty vehicles (HDV), which include trucks and buses, increased by 36% between 1990 and 2010 and are estimated to continue growing in the foreseeable future. HDV emissions currently represent around 30% of all road transport CO2 emissions and unless additional measures are taken by 2030 HDV emissions will increase to over 40% of road transport CO2. By 2030 HDV would emit around 15% of emissions not covered by the EU ETS (non-ETS/ESD) – which EU member states will have to reduce by 30% by 2030. The main reason for the increase of HDV carbon emissions is the stagnation of truck fuel efficiency coupled with increasing demand for road freight.

COP21: Shipping and aviation emissions are the elephants in the room

Aviation emissions are responsible for 5% of global warming and shipping makes up almost 3% of global CO2. These sectors have a CO2 impact equal to the UK and Germany and are continuing to grow rapidly – by up to 270% in 2050, by which time they could account for almost 40% of all emissions. Such emission growth will undermine reductions efforts by all countries and other sectors, effectively making the 1.5/2°C objective impossible to achieve.

NGO recommendations for upstream emissions reductions in the Fuel Quality Directive

The recently adopted implementing rules for the Fuel Quality Directive (FQD) include the possibility for fuel suppliers to use upstream emissions reductions (UERs) to reach the 6% decarbonisation target. This briefing contains T&E's recommendations for European Commission guidelines on UERs under the FQD. It outlines how the rules are vague and, without robust guidance by the European Commission and restrictions by member states, there is a risk of double counted and non-additional offset credits being used for compliance, seriously undermining the FQD’s effectiveness.

Too big to ignore – truck CO2 emissions in 2030

Emissions from heavy-duty vehicles (HDV), which include trucks and buses, increased by 36% between 1990 and 2010 and continue to grow. HDV emissions currently represent around 30% of all road transport CO2 emissions and 5% of all EU CO2 emissions. This briefing by T&E analyses existing data and finds that unless additional measures are taken HDV emissions will increase to 40% of road transport emissions by 2030.

Briefing: Environmental Goods Agreement

Launched in July 2014, the Environmental Goods Agreement (EGA) is being negotiated between the European Union – on behalf of its 28 member states – and 16 other members of the World Trade Organisation (WTO). The selection of goods for the EGA list was undertaken in secrecy and without a definition of an environmental good or selection criteria. T&E has identified around 120 items on the list of 650 goods for which we do not see any environmental justification for lowering tariffs. We argue that negotiations should open up and the assessment of what is an environmental good should be conducted by recognised experts in full transparency, on the basis of a widely accepted methodology.

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