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VW’s latest failure shows up Europe’s inadequate response to Dieselgate

The recent news that VW has failed to meet yet another deadline set by the US regulators to fix almost 600,000 of its diesel vehicles equipped with a defeat device has come as no surprise; VW has repeatedly missed deadlines and failed to provide adequate explanations since the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) disclosed the carmaker’s cheating last September.

Electric vehicles are gaining momentum - and China could be next

The idea of an electric vehicle (EV) sales quota is gaining momentum. Recently the Netherlands' parliament voted to make 100 per cent of new car sales emissions-free by 2025. Dutch MPs also told the government to make this possible through EU policy - most likely in the form of an EV sales quota for carmakers as part of the next round of car CO2 standards.

EU car testing proposals are a sticking plaster on a gaping wound

When French investigators swooped on Renault last week to seize computers, it was yet another stark illustration of the systemic failure of car testing in Europe. Their investigation is linked to the Volkswagen emissions scandal, where national testing authorities failed to detect or even investigate the cheating – despite being made aware of the exceptionally high on-road emissions.

VW’s cheating is just the tip of the iceberg

The prospect of Volkswagen being fined $18 billion for manipulating air pollution tests in the US caused its shares to fall 22% and is sending shock waves through the automotive industry. VW has been ordered to recall nearly 500,000 cars, meaning a massive bill to correct the vehicles and potential class action claims for compensation. After initially refusing to comment, CEO Winterkorn issued a statement saying he was “very sorry”. The evidence suggests he will not be the last head of a carmaker offering apologies in the next few months as other manufacturers will be found making use of “defeat devices” for tricking laboratory tests.

Paris as an engine for aviation innovation

The gripping Solar Impulse flight, and the news that Airbus has patented a plane that can fly from Paris to Tokyo in under 3 hours, shows that 100 years after the Wright Brothers, the aviation industry remains one of the few industries that can ignite our imagination with new ideas. It's essential though that this deep commitment to innovation is fully targeted at cleaning up of air travel.

America’s challenge to European truck supremacy

When people think about American trucks, the image that springs to mind is a massive Coca-Cola truck with a big nose. These massive rigs don’t seem particularly efficient and for a long time Europeans made fun of the big-nosed US mammoths. Some European manufacturers even boasted about how they sold out-dated technology in the US. This is about to change.

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