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30% energy savings by 2030 proposed

EU heads of government will be asked to approve an energy efficiency target of 30% in October following a proposal put forward by the Commission last month. Whether the 30% target, which is based on projections for 2030 that were made in 2007, should be binding on individual countries or at an EU-wide level will also be decided on by member states.

Commission considering optional carbon reporting as first tar sands arrive

As the first shipment of carbon-intensive Canadian tar sands oil arrived in Europe last month, the Commission was considering making it only optional for fuel suppliers to report on the carbon intensity of fossil fuels such as tar sands or oil shale under the Fuel Quality Directive.

MEPs to size up ministers' biofuels bargain

EU energy ministers have agreed a position on biofuels reform, backing a cap on the use of food crops at 7% but further weakening ILUC reporting compared to the Commission’s original proposal. They also set weak national sub-targets for advanced biofuels. But a more long-term concern is the absence of a post-2020 decarbonisation target for transport fuels.

Commission vague about lorry CO2 plans

The Commission’s proposed new lorry carbon dioxide strategy lacks decisive action to reduce the sector’s growing emissions in Europe, green transport campaigners have said. Under the plan, lorry CO2 emissions would be measured, certified and reported in the hope that increased transparency will accelerate improvements.

Germany backs binding energy efficiency target

Germany is arguing for the EU to tighten its target to cut energy consumption, in a bid to ease dependence on Russian gas. According to documents quoted by the Financial Times newspaper, Germany has called on the EU to set a binding target for energy efficiency to offer the ‘right impetus’ to overhaul Europe’s energy infrastructure.

Lorries: 21st-century fleet or dinosaurs on our roads?

Driving Europe’s transport industry in a more sustainable direction is a formidable challenge, not least because it means a fairly fundamental change in the way fairly large industries do their business. It is in the DNA of these industries to resist change forced upon them by politicians. Carmakers oppose CO2 standards that make them fit clean tech to their cars, the aviation and shipping industries oppose doing their share and of course oil companies fight any kind of change that could end our addiction to their products.

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